RUN PINK! This October, Newton will donate $5 to for every pair of race shoes sold. Shop mens or womens.


  • Newton Nation Recap

    Hello Newton Nation! Congratulations to everyone who hit the pavement in their Newton Juggernaut Rocket Ships over the weekend (aka "shoes").

    Team Elite Runner Fernando Cabada couldn't decide which race to do, so he did all of them. Fernando was the top American at Boilermaker, a few days later he raced the Buffalo Chase 4 miler where he picked up a new PR and made some friends (see photo for proof), and topped it all off with Rock and Roll Chicago two days later where he was fourth.

    Fernando and Friends after the Buffalo 4 Mile Fernando and Friends after the Buffalo 4 Mile

    Texas Ambassador Randi Schooley took a page out of Fernando's book and raced the Breckenridge 10k, Vail Hill Climb and Silver Rush 50 Mile within days of each other. Luckily, she lives in the Houston area, so she had plenty of mountains to train on.

    Randi on the uphilly section. All of the sections were uphilly. Randi on the uphilly section. All of the sections were uphilly.

    Clever Training in Florida joined forces with Newton's Carly Kennedy to do a beach clean up and run at Indian Rocks Beach.

    Once the beach was clean, Carly bought them all beers and they lived happily ever after. Once the beach was clean, Carly bought them all beers and they lived happily ever after.

    Team Elite Runner Jeannette Faber ran her first ever trail race over the weekend- the Bowie Park 6 miler. She managed to win and not face plant.

    Proof that she managed to keep her face on her face, and not on the trail Proof that Jeannette managed to keep her face on her face, and not on the trail

    We are days away from the 2015 edition of the Badwater 135 where Harvey Lewis will be returning in hopes of defending his title. Pam Reed and Meredith Dolhare will also be flying the flag for Newton Nation at Badwater.

    What tan lines? photo cred: John Borntrager The men's Fate are the most efficient Newtons for back floating. photo cred: John Borntrager

    Pro Triathlete Alex William Willis was 11th at the NYC triathlon, maybe Harvey Lewis can teach him how to save time in transition by leaving his shoes on for the swim.

    Diving into the pristine exotic waters of the tropical Hudson River Diving into the pristine exotic waters of the tropical Hudson River

    Georgia Ambassador Sara Maltby was the top lady overall at the Cremator Ultra 50 miler. Not to be confused with a cremeter. That is something else.

    And lastly, Newton's Expo team Yo and Don (also referred to as Yon in the office) and our VP of Ecommerce David Dunn (always referred to as David Dunn, despite being the only David in the office) worked the Napa to Sonoma Destination Race and then raced the race.

    Newton Running: Proud Sponsor of Destination Races. And people just rocking out. Newton Running: Proud Sponsor of Destination Races. And people who just want to rock out.




    Below you will find a series of Yoga poses designed with runner's in mind.  By following this guide and utilizing these poses you'll feel more connected and stronger with every run.
    Try them out and let us know how you #FeelNewton.
    yoga_for_runners1 Revolved Crescent Lunge

    REVOLVED CRESCENT LUNGE Tips: Twist the spine to one side, hooking the elbow outside of the knee. Stack the shoulders on top of each other. Use your core to keep your body lifted. #YogaForRunners #FeelNewton


    • Lengthens and stretches the spine.
    • Creates flexibility in the rib cage.
    • Stimulates the internal abdominal organs and kidneys.
    yoga_for_runners2 Side Plank

    SIDE PLANK Tips: Align your shoulders with your supporting wrist, creating a 90 degree angle. Keep your body in a strong, straight line without sagging in your stomach or hips. Keep your legs strong and core engaged.  #FeelNewton #YogaForRunners


    • Strengthen the wrists and elbow joint
    • Increase abdominal strength
    • Firm and tone the body
    yoga_for_runners3 Figure Four Pose

    FIGURE FOUR POSE This is a big hip releaser….get ready!

    Tips: Sit back into a seated position and cross one ankle above the opposite knee and flex the foot. Focus on a point on the floor to help secure your balance. Keep your weight in the standing heel and your hips level as you slowly hinge further to about 90 degrees at the standing knee.  Shift the torso and chest forward.  The goal is to ease the elbows to rest on the fronts of the shin.  Switch sides and repeat. #YogaForRunners #FeelNewton


    • Opens and released hips
    • Hamstring stretch (the more you lean forward)
    yoga_for_runners4 Extended Side Angle

    EXTENDED SIDE ANGLE Tips: Focus on keeping the weight off of your bottom arm and keep your upper body lifted by reaching up with your top arm.  Roll your shoulders back and keep your legs firm and strong.  HOLD IN YOUR STOMACH! #YogaForRunners #FeelNewton


    • Strengthens and stretches the legs, knees, and ankles
    • Stimulates abdominal organs
    • Increases stamina
    yoga_for_runners5 Downward Facing Dog


    DOWNWARD FACING DOG Tips: Relax your head and neck and gaze towards the front of the mat.  Keep your arms shoulder distance apart and your feet hip distance apart. Stretch your heels toward the floor (they don’t need to touch!). Engage your core and breathe normally. #YogaForRunners #FeelNewton


    • Calms the brain and helps relieve stress and mild depression
    • Stretches the shoulders, hamstrings, calves, arches, and hands
    • Strengthens the arms and legs
    • Improves digestion
    yoga_for_runners6 Warrior III

    WARRIOR III  Tips: Your arms, torso, and raised leg should be positioned parallel to the floor turning your body into the letter “T.”  Try to make sure the hip [of the raised leg] stays level with the opposite side. Reach in opposite directions with your arms and legs, stretching your body to the max! Remember to keep your gaze soft and keep breathing! #YogaForRunners #FeelNewton


    • Strengthens the ankles and legs
    • Tones the abdomen
    • Improves balance and posture
  • Feature Friday v2.0


    boxWelcome to Feature Friday with a twist. Instead of a shoe feature, we are going to drop some Newton Company knowledge on you. Have you ever wondered about the little "B" in the bottom corner of your shoe box? That is a B Corporation Certification symbol. Newton Running was the first Running Shoe Company to become B Corp certified. This initiative influences everything we do from our packaging that is made entirely of recycled materials, to the practices at our Headquarters of composting and bicycle commuting (not at the same time. We live dangerously, but not that dangerously). So what does all of this mean? Glad you asked! Here is the Cliffs Notes version to becoming B Corp certified, and what it means for Newton. And you- the Newtonites.

    To become B Corp certified, Newton had to complete an assessment that addresses:

    • Governance and transparency
    • Environmental Responsibility
    • Community Responsibility
    • Employee Treatment

    _E4A0091The documentation process is extensive, and took Newton a year from the time we decided to start the process to the certification completion. Newton will have to repeat the assessment every two years. The process becomes more rigorous with every recertification. It is B Corp's method for pushing companies to make ongoing incremental improvement

    Jerry's B Corp Thoughts

    To learn more, look here:  http://


    We're starting a new weekly blog to showcase the Newton Nation and the amazing races and places that Newton Running shoes take you each weekend.

    We hope you enjoy it.  Now on to the 4th of July version.

    We hope you all had a great 4th of July!  We have a simple math equation for determining if the holiday weekend was a success: add all of the fingers and eyebrows that survived the fireworks show, and subtract the number of hot dogs you ate. It is like golf, the lower your score the better. Negative numbers are best.

    • Georgia Ambassador Sara Maltby was the overall winner at the Bad Marsh Night 50k in Beaufort, South Carolina.
    Sara Sara Maltby
    • Arizona Ambassador Jonathan Schaller was 2nd in his age group at the Arizona 4th of July 4 Miler. Even better, this is the first picture he has submitted where he is awake, upright and wearing shoes. It only took 65 tries.
    Picture1 Jonathan
    • Team Elite Runner Bob Weiner won the Evergreen Freedom 5k, nice work Bob!
    Shauna BOCO on Green Mountain-Where's Shauna?
    • Newton Sales Support for Europe, Shauna, hiked Green Mountain on Saturday. She submitted photographic evidence. The Board is currently reviewing it for validity.
    Brenda Brenda Carwan
    • Team Elite Runner Brenda was the third overall female in Slovenia. Don’t worry Brenda, Michellie Jones can help you find a giant ATM for your giant check.
    Scott Scott
    • Team Elite Runner Scott won the Born in the USA 4 miler. From the looks of his pic, an Oak tree was a close second (or Ash tree? Maple tree? Christmas tree? We are bad at nature)
    Rick Rick Arminger
    • Ambassador Rick Arminger crushed Ironman Frankfurt over the weekend. It was warm. Very warm. So warm the finish line beer was warm. And that was Rick’s entire race report.
    Alaina Alaina
    • Ambassador Alaina Andersen was fourth in her age group in the Cazenovia 10 miler. Up next she will be racing Tyler McCandless and Fernando Cabada at Boilermaker this weekend. Consider yourselves warned, fellas.
    Linda and Jim Linda and Jim
    • Arizona Ambassadors Linda and Jim Ballard took a group of 24 runners to run the Alaska Marathon. Then they took a week long cruise where they managed to run 2 minute miles with the help of a moving ship. That is one way to beat the buffet.
    Nik Quick Nik
    • Team Elite Runner Nik won the North Canton 5 miler. There was no one in sight at the finish. Not even a Christmas tree.
    Bart Bart
    • Ambassador Bart Rein was 4th in his age group at the BRRC 5k, up next is the very climby and rocky Catoctin 50k. We don’t know what a Catoctin is, but it sounds intense.

    Have a great week Newton Nation and let us know what you're up to by using #FeelNewton across social media.

  • Running for MS

    Country singer Julie Roberts has seen many ups and downs. Through it all, she’s thankful for a lot, including, running.


    What are you thankful for? There was a time when this was a tough question for country singer, Julie Roberts, to answer. But these days, she is thankful for a lot. For one, she is thankful for running, but more so, for her ability to run.

    You may be familiar with the blonde country singer through her music, or even through her brief stint on the music show, The Voice. But what her fans did not know until 2011 was that Roberts had been diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2005.

    Although her first album was certified gold, selling more than 500,000 copies, Roberts’ second album did not perform as well and she parted ways with her recording label in 2010. Then, as she began to work on an independent album, the Nashville, Tennessee floods hit and she lost her home. “That was a difficult time. I had planned on being home to work on my record and then the flood came. We lived in four different places as we rebuilt our home.” To boot, in 2013, Roberts was a contender on The Voice, but surprisingly was not picked for a team. “There are ups and downs in life in general. Things are good and bad and you just have to keep going.”

    julie roberts

    The Diagnosis

    When she first started to notice her symptoms, Roberts says, “I had just released my first album and was touring non-stop…while I was on the road, I was holding the microphone like I always had for years and my hand went numb and I couldn’t hold the microphone. It wouldn’t happen all the time but every once in awhile my hands would go numb or my vision would get blurry, like when I was signing autographs.”

    With the symptoms becoming more noticeable, Roberts visited her doctor, who sent her to a neurologist and the diagnosis was confirmed. Not wanting to admit the diagnosis publically, Roberts began to exercise more, and even to eat healthier. In 2006, she joined her first running group, in her hometown of Nashville. “I love this group because some people are in the music industry, but there are a lot of people who do so many other things…We stay in contact throughout the week and every Saturday we meet.” And, they race together—5Ks, 10Ks, half marathons.

    Running for MS

    Julie 2

    “Running is definitely an escape for me, whether I’m with someone or alone. I feel like it centers me in my day. And it gives me a chance to see the cities.” These days, Roberts and her Newtons are seeing a lot of cities, approximately one to three a week. In addition to touring for her music, Roberts is also touring with the National MS Society, doing talks, presentations and playing her music. Work, which she says has given her a new purpose. “This work has honestly changed my life.”

    “Most people think they can’t exercise with MS, I tell people how important it is for me physically and emotionally to be active. I say just ‘start walking, walk 10 minutes.’ Whatever your goal is start with small goals.”

    One of Roberts’ goals is to show the world that MS doesn’t have to define your goals in your life. “There are challenges in my business. People are sometimes afraid to book you because you have MS and that you won’t be able to play a show. I want to show my industry and everyone else with MS that they can do whatever their goals are and that MS doesn’t have to define your goals in your life.” She adds, “A lot of people I meet work in the corporate world and they’re afraid to tell their boss they have MS. If I can go out and use my platform of music and show what MS looks like for me, hopefully it will help people around the country that face the same challenges I do.”

    New Inspiration

    “When I look back 10 years ago, I was on my first radio tour, trying to get them to play my music. Now, I’m flying into the same airports, but I’m going to visit people with MS and to try to inspire them to not give up. I know my music also inspires people, but I feel much more fulfilled than I did 10 years ago.”

    As for her running goals, Roberts just ran the 5-mile Boulevard Bolt in Nashville over Thanksgiving with her running group.  And in addition to trying to run in her Newtons in each city she visits, Roberts has a 50-mile Walk for MS, in Savannah Georgia, scheduled at the beginning of March and a half marathon in Nashville in April (as part of the Rock’n’Roll marathon series). “I always like to have goals,” she says. Ultimately, she adds, “My goal is to continue to be active and healthy. It energizes me and makes me happy.”

  • Keeping up with Sugarland guitarist, Thad Beaty

    When a health crisis hit his family, Newton Ambassador Thad Beaty, began to move his musical life toward new ways that mattered.


    Thad Beaty loves music. Always has. When the guitar player for the country band Sugarland, is not on the road, he’s in Nashville working at his day job, Sorted Noise, producing songs for movies. But in 2009, a curveball was thrown at him, when his mom was diagnosed with colon cancer. Since then, his daily routine has involved a lot more than music.

    At the time of the diagnosis, the 5’10” Beatty was 34 years old and weighed 230 pounds. He says, “We went into panic mode. My brother, my wife and I and my mom all decided as a family that we could do better at being healthy. So, we immediately started researching the best diet for dealing with cancer,” he says. What happened next, was something he never would have expected.

    Thad Beaty, guitarist for country Grammy band Sugarland

    “We learned that a raw diet, greatly lowers your cancer risk levels. But we thought, ‘good grief, there’s no way we can do that.’” Yet, he and his wife bought a Vitamix blender and started having smoothies for breakfast and salads for lunch. And suddenly, they were 66 percent raw already.

    “Before I knew it, I was fully vegetarian a few months out and the only thing left before I went Vegan was Greek yogurt—that was the last stronghold.”

    At the same time that his food transformation was taking place, Beaty started exercising.  While on the road with the band, he started to run. “I could take off running in the middle of nowhere.” When he came home there was a pool in his neighborhood, so he started swimming. Next, he pulled out his old mountain bike. “I was doing a little of each and a little more and then something just triggered along the way.”

    Before he knew it, Beaty was Vegan, and his training turned to competing in triathlons—not just sprint triathlons, but Ironman triathlons, with his first in Arizona in 2012, then Kona in 2013. His 230 pounds quickly melted away to a stealth 160 pounds. In a relatively short period of time, his very Southern family had completely transformed itself, including his mom, who is now gluten free and vegan.

    Along the way, Beaty started reading Newton co-founder, Danny Abshire’s book, Natural Running: The Simple Path to Stronger, Healthier Running. “I started working on all the drills. Then I bought Newtons and hit the road. I was amazed at how my body felt and my times were way faster. I was hooked.”

    As Beaty started down the Ironman path, he started to consider the powerful correlation between sport, the music industry and giving back. First, he struck up a relationship with the Ironman organization. Then, he began to look for companies who shared his belief system of giving back.  A training partner and Newton athlete, Shay Eskew, shared with him the non-profit work that Newton was doing. “Once I realized our core values aligned well, I had to reach out.” A partnership was struck, and now he says, “We have done some amazing things together and I think we will do a ton more.”

    Around this time, Beaty founded to encourage the music industry to give back in ways that are healthy for the community. His motivation was spurred by the fact that in addition to his mom’s illness, the band’s guitar tech, Kevin Quigley, was diagnosed with Lymphoma and lost his battle against the disease less than a year later.

    “Health is holistic. It is mind, body and spirit. If you don’t have a good balance of those three, then you are out of whack. I saw how harmonious endurance events and getting involved in social movements were together.”

    Now, Beaty and a team of about 20 people from the music industry are training for the Ragnar Relay from Chattanooga to Nashville in October to “reclaim their health”.  Of his teammates, Beaty says, “They didn’t all come from an athletic background and they want to make a change. So we’re going on this journey together.” Each member is doing the relay to raise money for a cause or non-profit of their choice. “What resonated so strongly with them is that endurance events become a beautiful vehicle to affect change. If you do it for a cause, it becomes super special.”

    Beaty and fellow Newton Runner, Bo Parrish, have also teamed up to form New Life for Newton, connecting gently used Newton shoes with cross-country and track coaches and inner city kids who are in need of shoes. They have enjoyed delivering the shoes themselves to these young running teams and spending an afternoon or day training with them. The list of initiatives Beaty has taken on is long and this is in addition to work and still training hard. Ironman Chattanooga in September is on his hit list for this year. But now with several races under his belt, he says, “It’s not about the finish line, it’s about everything you learn getting to the finish line and then that’s a place to celebrate everything you’ve learned and to carry those lessons forward.” For now, he’s celebrating the fact that his mom’s cancer is in remission.


    You can watch Thad Beaty on ABC this Tuesday, July 15, on “Extreme Makeover Weight Loss.” In the episode he worked with a woman who went from the couch to doing a 70.3 triathlon. Beaty says, “We had her rocking some Newtons.”

  • Winter’s World Record

    A World Record for Dad and the 1 in 6 Men Diagnosed with Prostate Cancer Each Year

    Where did the time go? It seems like I was just 10 years old sitting on the couch flipping through the Guinness Book of World Records. Now 15, I just got the email stating, “Winter, your world record for the youngest person to run a marathon on all 7 continents has officially been recorded into the record books”.  It seemed like such a simple task back then. Run seven marathons around the world. Running was by far the easiest part of realizing this dream, though. The journey? Well that is another story.

    At age 13, I ran my first marathon just 50 minutes from my Salem, Oregon home. Marathon great, Meb Keflezighi was there to give me encouragement and some last minute strategy. After all the controversy to get me into my first marathon, I felt I had a lot to prove that day. I still remember hearing my coach’s voice echo in my head as I hit mile 23, “Winter, you can run that course in 3:45:00”. Coach Hadley not only was right but more importantly he believed in me. Just five minutes shy of a Boston qualifying time, this 13 year-old conquered Eugene Marathon in 3:45:04. A precedent had been set. I was serious about my mission and my running.

    Marathon #1 Eugene Marathon April 29, 2012 Finish Time 34504- Winter with a Race Pacer Marathon #1 Eugene Marathon

    Running in Kenya

    Marathon #2 Amazing Maasai photo credit Paul Ark Marathon #2 Amazing Maasai photo credit Paul Ark

    My next marathon added many elements on top of the pure fact of running 26.2 miles. There was travel, heat, pre-race nutrition issues and much more to consider.

    You would think getting into a marathon in Africa would be easy for a 14 year-old, after all, it’s common for kids to walk more than ten miles round trip to school a day. I was shocked when I started getting turned down in South Africa by race directors.  By pure coincidence, I was introduced to The Amazing Maasai race directors who just happened to be two young women with running backgrounds. They had previously been on the Amazing Race TV Show, which is what inspired them to start this marathon to aid in the education of Kenyan girls. Thank goodness they believed in me! After taking 3rd place overall female in 4:04, through tough terrain and heat, my love for trail marathons began. I found the tougher the course; the stronger I performed. Much of my race was captured on film by a Canadian TV Show called Boundless.

    "El Fin Del Mundo," The End of the World

    Antarctica Marathon Marathon #3 Antarctica Marathon

    There is nothing like going from the extreme heat of the Maasai plains in Kenya to one of the harshest, coldest places in the world, Antarctica. First you fly to "El Fin Del Mundo," The End of the World, also known as Ushuaia, Argentina. Waiting for us there was a Russian research vessel to take us across Drakes Pass, know for some of the roughest seas in the World.

    Several day’s later, blustery weather prevented us from going on shore. Instead, we found ourselves on land, for the first time in days, just minutes before the start of the marathon. No one really talked about what “getting your sea legs,” meant, but several miles into the marathon I realized the ground appeared to be rolling like waves under my feet. By not having spent any time off the ship prior to running on land, I had not gotten rid of my “sea legs.”

    But without a single fall (the ice was another challenge), I finished in 4:49:45—another 3rd place finish. I was now the youngest person in the world to run 26.2 miles in Antarctica.

    Tough & Tougher

    Marathon #4 Inca Trail Marathon- Finish Line Winter 1st place female Marathon #4 Inca Trail Marathon

    Next, I headed to the Inca Trail, which I documented here in an earlier blog. At this, my fourth marathon, I captured my first overall female marathon win. If you are a runner and up for a challenge and adventure of a lifetime, the Inca Trail Marathon should definitely be on your bucket list.

    Half Trail/Half Road

    Marathon #6 New Zealand

    My fifth marathon was across the diverse terrain of a small island called the Great Barrier Island, off the coast of New Zealand. Running the first half of the marathon through the interior mountain trails and then finishing the last half on the paved coastline was an interesting mix to say the least. Even at my young age, it was definitely a transition my legs and feet felt, going from the soft surface of trails to the pounding of pavement. It definitely gave me a reminder of why I had fallen in love with trail running.

    The Trails of Genghis Khan & Ogres

    Marathon #5 Mongolia August 7, 2013 photo credit Fredrik Koerfer Marathon #5 Mongolia Photo Credit : Fredrik Koerfer

    The second toughest marathon I traveled to was definitely Mongolia’s Sunrise to Sunset Marathon, which I also documented in an earlier blog. Despite the remoteness of this marathon, the incredibly athletic and talented crew from Boundless was able to capture amazing footage for their TV Show. The crew ran alongside us through the dark forest, down the steep ravines, all the while carrying heavy cameras and microphones. I was truly in awe as I caught glimpses of the TV crew at random places on the course.

    A World Record

    Panathinaikon Stadium- Photo Credit- Athens Classic Marathon Marathon #6 Athens Classic Photo Credit- Athens Classic Marathon

    I learned a lot about history from the places I traveled over my 18-month journey. Completing my marathon tour in Athens, Greece, on the original course of Phidipiddies, was a fitting place to set a marathon world record. A place where women where originally shunned and even killed for watching the Olympics. Where only “winners” were called athletes, others were just mere participants. It was my first full road marathon since Eugene and I cherished every footstep across the 26.2 miles. The spectators that lined the course all shouted “Bravo” as we ran by. In Greece, runners are still considered highly respectable athletes and are praised. Crossing the finish line in the Panathenaic Stadium, home of the first modern Olympics, was an unforgettable moment. I pointed to the sky, symbolically to my dad, as I always do at the finish line, and thought to myself, “Dad, we did it!”

    Back to Snow

    Immediately upon returning from Greece, I exchanged my running shoes for ski boots. I had only a few days to reflect on my five-year journey to setting this world record. I think it will take me years to really comprehend what I was able to accomplish. My aerial skiing has now taken precedence in my life as I pursue a spot at the 2018 Winter Olympics. Several weeks ago I concluded my 2014 aerial season with a Jr. National title and 5th Place podium at the Jr. World Freestyle Championships in Italy. Some great steps toward my next big dream have been taken.

    Winter NorAm Cup 2013 Mid Air Closeup Photo Credit- Trev Mozingo Photo Credit : Trev Mozingo

    Will there be an Ultra?

    Many are asking what is next with my running. I definitely plan to tackle my first ultra marathon in the near future. As of today, my Newton running shoes are back on as I train for two big events in June 2014. I have been asked to join the winning team from last year’s Ropa Run in Europe. This is a well-known relay running event in Europe that raises money for cancer. I will join a team of seven men, with a total support crew of 26 people. We will run a 330-mile relay from Hamburg, Germany to Rotterdam, Netherlands. I will run roughly 80, one-kilometer sprints over a 30-hour period.

    Then, I will join Simon Donato and a crew of elite runners and searchers to explore the high Sierras of California in search of a missing, downed military plane. We will hike up to 15 miles a day in harsh terrain at elevations of 10,000 to 12,000 feet, camping in tents and supported only by supplies brought in on horseback. Follow me on this great adventure with Adventure Science!

    Obstacle Course Racing & More

    I’m currently planning the rest of my summer events. Aside from my aerials training, you will definitely see me challenging my Newton’s on the Spartan Race courses, including the Spartan World Championships—and why not throw in a few triathlons as well!

    Never Give In!


    Join Team Winter or make a Donation!

  • ‘Tis the Season to Give Back - An Interview with Wendy Lee

    “Our company was founded on the principle of helping others. It starts with our commitment to our community and continues with our involvement with a diverse range of philanthropic organizations both here and abroad.”


    Is this a running company? Yes, it is. And, yes, this is what’s written at the top of Newton’s Global Responsibility page. “It’s my dad,” explains Wendy Lee, whose dad, Jerry Lee, is CEO and cofounded Newton Running together with Danny Abshire, CTO. “Honestly, when he founded the company with Danny, he was at a point where he had been very successful in his previous career. He said, ‘If I’m going to start another company, and particularly a running shoe company, the reason I’m doing it is to help other people.’ It starts with him and he made the philosophy from the beginning and made it understood.” Lee, who is Director of Global Sustainability and oversees Newton’s initiatives in this arena, adds, “Of course, we want to make the best running shoe and provide the best running education, but at the end of the day we want to help the lives of other people.”

    And this isn’t just a Jerry and Danny thing. Employees hear about social responsibility in their initial interviews and are introduced to it in the orientation process. It’s also written into job descriptions. “Every employee needs to be involved with social responsibility to whatever level possible. Everyone knows that’s what we stand for and that’s why we exist.  It’s not just something we do on the side, this is why we exist and I find that people really like it and get excited,” explains Lee.

    So what exactly does all this talk mean?

    • Prostate Cancer Foundation:

      Newton has supported the prostate cancer foundation for many years. Lee’s dad and founder, Jerry, is a prostate cancer survivor (since 2005), so she says, they feel strongly about that one. Newton Running also sponsors team athlete Winter Vinecki, who lost her dad to prostate cancer and races to raise funds to fight the disease.


    • Team Kokua:

      Newton has always encouraged athletes to participate in triathlon, while raising funds for causes that hit close to home, such as prostate cancer. In 2013, Newton partnered with the Ironman Foundation to create an ambassador team of 45 athletes. This team of athletes not only raced, but they were charged with raising funds and participating in direct service projects to give back to designated non-profits in the communities in which they were racing. The team has raised $70,000 so far, and Lee is hoping they will break $100,000. Most recently, the team was in Arizona where they organized a track and field day at a school, and then presented a check to the school to go toward a PE program and physical fitness. Next year, Lee says she expects the team will have closer to 60 athletes.

    Team 2

    • Trickle Up:

      Newton has sponsored Trickle Up since 2008. It is an organization that provides education, training and grants for some of the world’s poorest people to develop microenterprises. “It’s a small charity, but they do incredible work,” says Lee. “Trickle Up focuses on the extreme poor, who seem to be overlooked by other charities. They are left out because they are so isolated and impoverished. They live on under $1.50 a day. There are a lot of people, especially women with children living under this poverty line. The quality of life is very low.” 

    Trickle Up works with local organizations to help train these women how to start their own businesses, usually in textiles or farming. They help these women to establish their own micro-economy and to have a sustainable economy for themselves, which then allows their kids to go to school and to get an education. Each season, Newton chooses a shoe from which a $1 per sale goes to the Trickle Up campaign.

    casa guatemala

    • One World Running:

      This Boulder-based, nationwide, volunteer-run organization takes in used running shoes, cleans them up and delivers them to impoverished villages around the world. When they deliver them, they typically host a race in the village the next day. Newton Running has donated more than 5,000 pairs of mostly new shoes to the organization. “We have a constant stock that we donate to them,” says Lee.


    • Back on my Feet:

      This group is east coast based with offices around the country. Back On My Feet organizes running groups for homeless shelters. They meet once or twice a week in the morning and run as a group. Newton donates shoes for every participant in each of the locations around the country (more than 1,000 pairs).


    Being a company that does the right thing also means that after Hurricane Sandy hit, Jerry Lee spontaneously gave 100s of pairs of running shoes that the company had brought to sell at the New York marathon expo to a group of firefighters who happened to be walking through the expo. They in turn donated the shoes to survivors of the hurricane.  Likewise, shoes have been sent to the Philippines and the company even helped their own community after the Colorado floods sent water gushing through Newton’s backyard this fall.  “We are always ready to help where we can,” says Lee. The company also gives a discount to military members.

    Although Jerry Lee won’t toot his own horn, his daughter will, as will Newton employees who have witnessed the giving firsthand. Lee encourages others in the running community to do the same, to look around and see where there is a need. “If there’s any way to help, then do it. Be aware of what’s going on and get involved.” She adds, “We have so much to be thankful for, our health and our well being, particularly when you think about the flooding and the fires that have happened in our own backyard. We’re thankful as a company for our customers and their support of us. We have been fortunate and continue to be so as a company, so it’s our responsibility to give back. It’s what we do.”

  • Experience Spartan World Championships With a 14 Year-Old

    I sat on the steep hillside with a 5-gallon bucket of gravel between my legs, protecting it from spilling. This was just a temporary stop to collect my strength as I climbed up the Killington, Vermont ski run. It was a brutal reminder that ski slopes are for skiing down and that is it! This same obstacle was my biggest challenge at my first Spartan Beast several months ago in Utah. The sight of a bucket now makes me cringe. Descending the hillside, with my bucket in my arms, I thought I might actually cry. As I dumped my gravel into the bin at the end, successfully completing the obstacle, I said to myself, “Pull yourself together, you still have a long way to go.”

    Spartan Vermont Beast World Championships 2013-start line

    Show Time

    I had no idea this race would be so hard. Standing at the start line, I felt welcomed amongst my new Spartan family. I appreciated the cheers and well wishes from my fellow racers as my name was called to the start line of the Spartan World Championships. I found myself standing amongst some of the world’s greatest athletes. There were Olympians from around the globe as well as Xterra, USTAF and Trail World Champions, Professional Obstacle Course Racers, Adventure Racers, triathletes and marathon winners. This talented group of athletes, including the Spartan Pro Team, will be featured in the NBC Sports Network TV special about the World Championships on October 19th.

    Given Spartan’s history and the presence of NBC TV, most of us assumed we were about to embark on the toughest, most grueling 13-mile course ever designed by Spartan. Little did we know how humbling the day would be—the steep climbs, cold water and grueling course would sideline even some of the world’s most fit athletes.

    Climbing & Descending

    The first part of the course was mainly a steep never-ending trail climb up the hills of Killington Ski Resort. I was happy with my selection of running this course in my Newton Distance. I knew there would be a lot of serious climbing so I chose to stay on the lighter side with my shoes. I had done my last Spartan Beast in my Newton All-weathers. The unique lug design of Newton shoes is not only great for forefoot running but also provides great traction on these difficult courses. Spartans were once again falling, slipping and sliding on the steep descents and I was able to keep my footing. There were a few walls and round hay bails to climb on our way up, which is always fun.

    Spartan Vermont Beast World Championships 2013-wall traverse

    Living and training at 7,000 feet in Park City, UT, as well as only carrying 98 pounds on my small frame, was a great advantage on the first part of the course. I was surprised to find myself hanging with many of the elite females for the first six to seven miles. It was only when we encountered the heavy obstacles, that their more adult bodies became a huge advantage for them.

    Two-thirds My Weight

    Upon reaching one of the few black diamond ski runs at Killington, I peered up the steep slope.  As far up the mountain as I could see, it was just a stream of racers carrying something. As I approached a pile of sandbags, I quickly realized there was only one size. Many of the weighted obstacles at Spartan Races have female and male sized weights. This was the World Championships, though, what was I thinking. There was no time to stop and think. This was a race!

    Spartan Vermont Beast World Championships 2013-60#sandbag carry

    As a competitive athlete, you learn to improvise as you go. I wasn’t sure how I would handle this heavy obstacle but knew I just had to get moving with it. I grabbed my sandbag, tossed it up onto my back and began the long trek. I would alternate carrying the weight on one shoulder, then the other. When both shoulders got fatigued, I would place it evenly across my upper back and neck.  The one thought I had the entire time was, “Why is a 14-year-old girl carrying what a grown man is carrying?” At the time, I had no idea I was carrying 60 pounds, literally two-thirds my body weight. All I knew was, “It was heavy”.  It was only after the race, that I had learned the actual weight we were all carrying.

    Burpees & Perseverence

    The Hercules Hoist gave me my first set of burpees. A cement bucket is hooked to a pulley system.  You must use a rope to pull the bucket up to the top. As I started to hoist the bucket up, I would quickly find myself being pulled up in the air as the bucket returned to the ground. “You got to be kidding me! I’ve done this before. This cement bucket must be heavier than my last race.” After being lifted off the ground several times and only getting the weight half way up, I realized Hercules would win today. I immediately started doing my 30 burpees.

    Spartan Vermont Beast World Championships 2013-rope climb

    During the entire race I was reminded, “I had it easy.” I was not carrying a tumor, like my new friend, Iram Leon. He is 32 years old and living with an inoperable brain tumor, yet not letting it slow him down. I had two healthy legs unlike the amputee that crawled up the entire Killington ski slope on his hands and knees or like the female amputee who stood at the start line with me. I was able to just be at the event, unlike my dad and many others that left this world too soon. It wasn’t hard to put my pain aside and persevere.

    Having previewed the course the day before, I knew the water obstacles would come at miles seven and ten. Seeing all the water on this course, I also knew I wanted a shoe that had great drainage, not one that would hold water. I had poured water in my Newton trainers prior to the race to see how quickly it would drain out. Unlike many Spartans, I was not intimidated by the water, but rather excited. As a two-time triathlon national champion, I had been battling it out in the water since I was five years old. I didn’t take into account, however, how much wearing shoes affected your ability to swim. I was especially glad I didn’t wear a hydration pack like so many did. It would have been yet another thing to weigh me down as I swam across the frigid water and climbed up the rope climbs.

    Tarzan & The Tyrolean Traverse

    The Tarzan Swing was nearly impossible! I heard of only one female who made it successfully across. This obstacle consisted of ladders and ropes suspended from a bridge in the middle of a lake. After swimming out and climbing up to the top of the bridge, there were about five or six little ropes. One had to swing across these ropes to get to the bell. I made it across two ropes then fell about ten feet into the lake.  As I swam to shore, my only thought was, "I think I’m turning into an ice cube." As I crawled onto shore, it was burpee time again.

    Spartan Vermont Beast World Championships 2013-barb wire

    Next up, the Tyrolean Traverse. Imagine a rope suspended across water; a kids dream, an adult’s nightmare! I may have moved slower than Sid, the two-toed sloth, but I made it! I hung below the rope with just my knees and elbows draped over the long rope that spanned the freezing cold, irrigation pond for the ski resort. There was no way I was going to fall off that rope, swim to shore, do 30 burpees and then have to reattempt it again. It was pretty intimidating seeing Elite men wrapped in a foil blanket at the edge of the water, hypothermic and unable to continue on. Today, the Tyrolean Rope would separate the winners from the losers. All I could think was, “Just hang on!” I have some great rope burns on my arms to show for my effort.

    Tyrolean Traverse- Spartan Vermont Beast World Championships 2013

    Pushing Beyond

    The Spartan World Championships pushed me farther, mentally and physically, than I have ever been pushed before. However, with this being said, I know I have not reached my limit. There is always a take home lesson I learn from every race; whether it is a triathlon, a marathon, an aerial skiing competition or a Spartan Race. Spartan reminded me how crucial the mental component of a sport can be. Even if your body wants to give up, you can usually mentally keep pushing on and many times your body will recover. If you give up mentally though, it is over immediately.

    Spartan Vermont Beast World Championships 2013-fire jump

    For many, crossing the finish line on Saturday was the end of their race weekend. Placing first in the world in the 19 & under open division and 28th amongst the elite females was perhaps my greatest accomplishment ever. However, the most important race to me was actually the next day. For the first time, Spartan offered a charity race. Beat up and exhausted but willing to do it all again, my team of five athletes, Team Winter, set out Sunday morning to try to capture the Spartan Charity Race Title. Our team raced for the 1 in 6 men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer, the cancer that took my 40 year-old-dad from me when I was only 9-years-old.

    We were expected to navigate a two- to three-mile course, with the fastest three times from each team counting. Seeing some of Spartan’s best obstacle course racers smiling at the start line Sunday and getting their “Spartan On” for something bigger than themselves was a great sight. These guys and gals went out with revenge and were ready to give everything they had left for their cause. Although Team Winter took 2nd place by only a few seconds, we were proud to stand on the podium as one of the top five teams in the world. Each team took prize money home for their charity and most importantly raised awareness for their cause.

    Finish Line Spartan Vermont Beast World Championships 2013

    Spartan World Championships was great training as I headed into my sixth marathon on October 12th on New Zealand’s Great Barrier Island—my second to last continent on my world marathon tour for prostate cancer awareness. Keep following Newton for my next race report!

    Never Give In!


    Join Team Winter or make a Donation!

  • Giving Back To Kids In Kauai

    In the last two years of visiting the island of Kauai and winning the Kauai Marathon I felt a connection to the island.  In 2011, I stayed in a family’s guest bedroom and felt like I was a member of the family. I could not afford to stay in a hotel so this was the most affordable place I could find off of This ended up being a “blessing in disguise” because I was able live like a local for a week.  Sadly, I noticed the poverty was prevalent across the island.  As a runner, I became immediately aware of the lack of proper shoes.  I learned that there was not a running specialty store on the island and many are therefore only able buy their shoes at K-Mart, Walmart, or Costco.  This year I wanted to make a positive difference to the island and I thought it would be very beneficial to get the kids on the island in Newton shoes.  If you’ve ever browsed the Newton Running Website, you’d find a global responsibility page that highlights a lot of the great work being done across the world through Newton Running. When I proposed the idea to Newton, they liked the idea to donate shoes to the Kauai youths and I went to work with the Kauai Marathon to organize it.  The Kauai Marathon loved the plan and a few months later we had nearly 100 pairs of sizes for elementary and high school students shipped to Kauai.

    Tyler 1

    This year was the first year the Kauai Marathon added Keiki (kid’s) races.  The toddler trot was for kids up for 4 years old (100m dash), the 4-7 age group will race 1/4 mile and the 8-12 age group will race the 1/2 mile.  The course was planned on a beautiful section of grass next to the Grand Hyatt. We also did a ‘fun run’ on a dirt cane road near the Grand Hyatt.  In addition, Bart Yasso (CRO at Runner’s World), Dean Karnazes (ultramarathon man), Michael Wardian, and myself would be at the expo for presentations and Q&A.  Since the high school runners rarely have the opportunity to learn about running, this was a great opportunity to get the high school kids excited for cross country season. The big goal of the two weeks: get kids inspired to run and live a healthy lifestyle while providing shoes to the kids that need them.

    Tyler 2

    The Kauai Marathon decided to make a $500 donation to the school that brought in the most participants to the Keiki races.  This was publicized and the marathon public relations director Robin Jumper went to work on organizing the elementary schools for me to give a presentation.  I gave presentation to full school assemblies at four elementary schools and ran with three high school cross country teams. The goal was to get the kids excited to run the Keiki races, inform them what running is all about, and to share my experiences traveling across the US and the world. I learned that kids are very brave and love to ask questions.  Some of the questions I received were…

    “What the longest you’ve ever run?”

    “How many medals do you have?”

    “How many race have you won?”

    “Have you ever raced Usain Bolt?”

    When asked if I have ever raced Usain Bolt, my response was “No, but I guarantee that if he shows up on Sunday I can beat him in the marathon!!”

    On Wednesday I had a meeting with the mayor where he was shocked at the generosity.  He said that I was his “braddah” and I was blessed for helping with the kids. He explained how the island is building bike and walking paths to give kids and parents the opportunity to walk or bike to school/work.  He was hopeful that the Kauai Marathon youth program and Newton Running would inspire more kids to lead a healthy lifestyle.  This meeting with the mayor lead to a newspaper article (“Students Score Newtons”) in the Garden Isle that spread the word about the Kauai Marathon Youth Program and Newton shoes donation.

    Tyler 3

    On Saturday morning, the course that race director Bob Craver and I designed, was fortunate to have an impressive 171 kids running around it with their parents and spectators cheering them on! To put that number into perspective, I talked to all schools within a half hour drive and that was about 750 kids less than 13 years old. Some of the kids came from the mainland, but that’s still over 10% of the keiki’s came from local elementary schools! I spent the morning cheering on the kids and taking pictures with them and their parents. It was a fantastic morning and a very successful event. I took so many pictures with families where I had spoke to the kids at the schools. My favorite was the registration form that came back saying they signed up because the daughter heard me speak in school. A picture says a 1,000 words so here are a few gems mostly from Jo Evans of Dakine Images of the event…

    All Keiki races were led by a giant rooster. Yes, he is undefeated (121-0 in fact) in his career leading keiki races.

    Tyler 4 Photo posted by Brennecke’s BeachFront Restaurant after the Keiki Races!
    Tyler 5 JT Service (, Dean Karnazes and I getting the kids warmed up. JT did a wonderful job getting the kids moving, warmed-up, and excited for the races!
    Tyler 7 One of the proudest moments of my life was reading this…inspiring kids to run and lead a healthy lifestyle is so important.

    When I walked back to my room and laid down after the event, all I could think about was how incredible this event was.  This was by far the most rewarding experience in my life.  Immediately I started thinking… “How can I get more kids to participate?  How do I help more kids have proper footwear?  How do I inspire more kids to run and lead a healthy lifestyle?  How in the world do I properly thank the Kauai Marathon and Newton Running for allowing me to be a part of this incredible experience?  How do I spread the word to other runners about what an amazing family event the Kauai Marathon weekend is? How do we get more high school kids in Kauai to do cross country and participate in the events?

    The next morning was the Kauai Marathon and my turn to run.

    The next morning was the Kauai Marathon and my turn to run.  I woke up at 2:45AM, had breakfast, and was browsing the newspaper to kill time.  I found a 'letter to the editor' from one of the high school coaches who applauded me for being a role model for young kids. At that point I knew that I couldn't lose the race.  After speaking to the kids about setting goals, working hard towards your goal, and then the joy of sharing your success with others, I knew I had to be a living example for them. Two hours, twenty-one minutes, thirty-three seconds, and 26.2 miles later I achieved my goal of winning the race and setting a new course record.  I was motivated by the dozens of handmade signs on the course that said "Go Tyler" and the number of volunteers that cheered me on by name.

    Pomaika'i is the hawaiian word for good fortune/good luck.  When I was doing my last long run on the island before the race a white owl flew in front of me for nearly a mile.  The owl is a symbol of pomaika'i and the white owl is the rarest of all.  Without the fear of sounding cheesy, Newton Running is going to experience a lot of pomaika'i for the generosity this year.  Thank you all for letting me be a part of it!

    Enjoy the photos below…

    Tyler 9 With the Island School XC Team
    Tyler 10 On my way to a new course record at the 2013 Kauai Marathon!


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