Nutrition

  • Fuel For The Run!

    Let's face it eating healthy while on the go can be a feat in itself! Check out this portable, healthy snack from Chef Justin Cogley that will keep you operating at your best even when time is not on your side!

    Bar

    Ingredients:

    Makes about 20 Bars

    4 Cups Oats
    1/2 Cup Sliced almonds (no skin)
    1/4 Cup Sunflower seeds
    1/4 Cup Flax Seed
    1 Cup Diced Dried apricot
    1/2 Cup Dried Cherry or Cranberry

    1/2 Cup grape seed oil or coconut oil
    1/2 Cup Peanut Butter
    1/2 Cup Brown sugar
    1/2 Cup Maple syrup
    1 tsp. vanilla
    pinch of salt

    Method:

    Pre heat oven to 350. degrees. Bake in a 9 1/2 by 12 by 1 inch pan. ( or something similar) The bars should be about 1 inch thick. (the 1 inch is my preference for a thicker chewy bar)

    Mix the dry ingredients together. Heat all the wet ingredients over medium low heat until the sugar is combined. Next, pour the wet ingredients over the dry and mix until combined.

    Once the mixture is all combined put into the baking pan. Put the pan into the oven for 7 minutes at 350 degrees. At 7 minutes pull out the pan from the oven and press the bar down all around with a spatula. This will help it stay together later. Then return to the oven for 8 more minutes. After a total baking time of 15 minutes pull out and let cool for 20 minutes. Finally cut into bars. They will last for around 5 days at room temperature. Take on your next running adventure

  • Post Workout Pork Recipe

    Exercising depletes your resources and fuel stores from your muscles. Eating within an hour of completing your workout will help to increase your recovery time and set you up for success on your next workout . Below is one of our favorite post workout recipes from Chef Justin Cogley. If you're short on time, consider grabbing a Lärabar or something that will refuel you on the go!

    Milk fed pork, Apple, Kale, Toasted Pumpkin Seeds

    Steamed Rice

    1 cups long-grain white rice
    1 1/2 cups water
    1 teaspoon kosher salt (optional)
    Total Time: About 30 mins
    Makes: About 3 cups

    Method
    Place rice and measured water in a medium saucepan with a tight fitting lid and bring to a boil over high heat. Add salt (if using), stir to incorporate, cover, and reduce heat to low. Simmer undisturbed until rice is tender, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let sit covered to steam, about 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork and serve. Check Seasoning

    Raw Kale Salad

    1/4 cup dried cherries, chopped
    1 cup small diced green apple, (about 1 apple) squeeze some lemon juice on it after you dice it
    1 pound fresh Tuscan kale, washed, rinsed, and patted dry (any type of Kale would work)
    1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
    3 Tbsp olive oil
    1 Tbsp seasoned rice vinegar
    1 Tbsp honey Or agave syrup
    Salt and pepper to taste
    1/2 cup fried pumpkin seeds

    Method
    Use a sharp knife to cut out the tough midrib of each kale leaf, and discard or compost. Slice the leaves crosswise into thin slices. The easiest way to do this is to work with a small bunch of leaves at a time, stack the leaves and roll them into a loose cigar shape. Then using a sharp knife, work from one end of the "cigar" to the other, slicing as thin as you can. Place the kale slices into a large bowl.

    In a smaller bowl, whisk together the apple cider vinegar, olive oil, rice vinegar, honey or agave salt, and pepper. A hour before serving, toss the kale together with the dried cherries, green apple and the dressing, allowing the kale to marinate a bit. Right before serving, Top with the fried mustard seeds

    Roast Pork Shoulder

    1(3-4 lb) pork shoulder butt, roast
    2 Cups apple juice
    2 Tablespoons Fennel seed, Toasted and Ground
    1 Tablespoon Coriander seed, Toasted and ground
    1 Tablespoon Smoked Paprika
    1 Teaspoon brown sugar
    2 Tablespoon salt
    Fresh Ground Pepper (to taste)

    Using hands press the brown sugar and spices well into the meat on all sides making certain to adhear the spice mixture to the meat. Place the roast in a casserole dish with a lid. Add the apple juice.
    Cover tightly.
    Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Add the roast for 15 min. and then immediately reduce the temperature down to 200 degrees F. Roast for about 4 hours or until the meat is falling-apart tender (cooking time will vary depending on the size of the roast). Slice meat as desired. CHECK SEASONING.

    Now put the dish together. Put around half a cup of rice,(depends how hungry you are) top with a portion of the pork, finally adding the kale salad on top. Top with more fried pumpkin seeds. Enjoy after a long run.

  • Breakfast On The Go

    Let's face it life is busy. We get it. From the time you wake up to the time you go to bed, you’re moving in a hundred different directions (or at least it feels like it) between work, family, friends, and, getting that daily workout in. But on top of all of those daily activities, we sometimes neglect to refuel our bodies with the right nutrients to keep us going. So here's an easy solution: a quick-and-easy breakfast that you can take anywhere (at anytime…we won't hold you to breakfast). It can even be prepped over the weekend for the week ahead. Give it a whirl…and then let us know what you think!

    muffin Pumpkin Quinoa Muffins

    What you'll need -

    • ¾ cup whole wheat flour
    • ½ cup all purpose flour
    • 1 tsp baking soda
    • ½ tsp baking powder
    • 1 tsp cinnamon
    • ½ tsp nutmeg
    • ½ cup brown sugar, packed
    • ¼ cup agave nectar or honey
    • 1 egg
    • 1 egg white
    • ¼ cup plain Greek yogurt
    • ¼ cup canola or olive oil
    • 1 tsp vanilla
    • ¾ cup pumpkin purée
    • ½ cup cooked quinoa

     

    Now for the cooking -

    • Preheat the oven to 350°F.
    • Mix together flours, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon and nutmeg. Set aside.
    • In a large mixing bowl combine brown sugar, agave nectar, egg, egg white, Greek yogurt, oil and vanilla, mix well. Stir in the pumpkin, add the dry ingredients and the quinoa; mix until combined.
    • Drop batter into a lined muffin tin filling the cups ⅔ full, and bake for 18 minutes.
    • Remove from the oven and allow to cool for 5 minutes.

     

    * Transformation - Add in ½ cup fresh or frozen blueberries

    * Muffins can be made in advance and stored in the freezer.

  • Nutrition tips for success

    An interview with trainer and nutritionist, Lindsay Christen

    As January came and went, so too went many of our New Year’s Resolutions, sometimes it’s hard to make our lofty goals (I’m going to run faster, eat healthier, drink less coffee) a habit overnight. So let’s press the reset button. We caught up with trainer and certified nutritionist, Lindsay Christen, to talk about changing habits and the most common nutrition question she gets asked.

    LindsayChristen1

    QUESTION:  “What should I eat before or after a workout?”

    Lindsay: Eating the right foods at the right time is essential to getting the most out of your workouts. For pre-workout you always need a little bit of something in your body and you’ll feel better if it’s 45-minutes to an hour before your workout. The general idea is that you’re filling up your energy stores. If your meals the day and week before have been healthy and balanced your glycogen, the storage form of energy in your body, should be good. Those taps should be full, so you’re just topping-off the tank when you have a pre-workout snack—it doesn’t need to be large.

    Right before a workout, a little bit of something like banana and almond butter, or non-fat Greek yogurt, or a couple of eggs are perfect, something small but enough to give the glycogen stores a boost.

    The dinner the night before an event or big workout should be lots of lean protein, chicken or fish—vegetarians can eat beans, lentils, tofu—and lots of veggies and complex carbs (starchy veggies, whole grains, like rice, quinoa). That combination should give your body what it needs for the next day. For an endurance athlete, depending on what they’re training for, 45-65% of total calories should be from carbohydrates. It’s a big window and it’s on the higher end, but they need it for the workouts, otherwise you feel like you’re on an empty tank all the time.

    What’s really important is the post workout snack. The right combination of nutrients and timing can optimize your lean muscle building while minimizing breakdown (soreness and fatigue). But you only have a window of 30 minutes after exercise when the body is most efficiently absorbing much needed nutrients.  If you miss the window, your body will try to replenish on its own by depleting your fat and energy stores.

    Newton: What’s a good post-workout snack? Is there anything to chocolate milk?

    Lindsay: Chocolate milk is not terrible. It’s a good source as long as it’s the good kind and not filled with high fructose corn syrup. A protein smoothie is good. You’re looking for a 2-1 or 3-1 carb to protein ratio in grams. This equates to 1-1.5g of carbohydrate for every kg of your body weight and 0.5g or protein/kg of body weight. This could be a bar that you throw in your gym bag for the way home, peanut butter and apple or a peanut butter banana sandwich really works well, or fresh fruit, Greek yogurt, and a scoop of protein powder.

    Now, if you just finished an Ironman, or marathon, you can eat whatever you want. You’re going to be depleted no matter what. You need to get nutrients in as soon as possible after the race, and then continually. Usually liquids work well, you want electrolytes, and then carbs and proteins.

    Lindsay’s Caveat: No matter what you do, start early. Incorporate these changes into your routine months and months beforehand. It’s not going to work for you if you start on race day. Eating well has to be a habit. You need to build your body into the machine you want it to be in race season. You also don’t want to add everything in at the same time. It’s February, so this is the perfect time to add things in if you have a race in June, July or August.  It’s about developing the right habits to weave into your lifestyle. It shouldn’t just be, “It’s race season, so I am going to stop eating hamburgers.” Our bodies are machines and the more quality fuel you can give it now, the more efficient it will be in performance when you need it.

    Lindsay Christen, is a certified personal trainer (CPT) and certified nutritionist (CNS). She holds a Masters of Science in nutrition. You can find her at Boulder’s Colorado Athletic Club or email her at: lindsaychristen@gmail.com.

  • From the Expert: Dr. Mark Cucuzzella's Simple Food Rules for Runners

    This article originally appeared on Dr. Mark's, Natural Running Center

    My wife’s grandmother lived to 103, and the holidays just past have reminded me of how she lived. She was not a runner, nor did she do a lot of cardio, except for sauce stirring and daily walks to markets and church. Our own local legend Frank Buckles who lived to 110 ate in this manner too; he was a farmer.

    Walking and running are good for you, but without proper nutrition one will not achieve optimal health.

    On  this topic, I encourage you to read Dr. Phil Maffetone’s most recent Natural Running Center’s article that examines the negative impact of sugar consumption (even from refined-flour food favorites such as bagels) and the runner.  As he points out, “Unfortunately, too many of these calories burned during a workout are in the form of sugar and not fat. This occurs because the consumption of sugar affects one’s metabolism, forcing the body to use much more glucose for energy and too little fat. The result is less energy available for working out and virtually all other activities, and, because less fat is used for energy, it’s stored throughout the body.”

    Best-selling food author Michael Pollan has written extensively on the topic of sound, life-extending nutrition. He states, “Cultures eating wide variety of traditional diets do not get Western diseases.” How true.

    And many of us have committed to memory his simple recommendation: “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants”

    In his book, “Food Rules,” he identified “64 Health and Nutrition Facts. The Unfortunate Truths” Here’s 10 of them from his useful list:

    2. Don’t eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.
    17. Eat only foods that have been cooked by humans.
    18. Don’t ingest foods made in places where everyone is required to wear a surgical cap.
    19. If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don’t.
    20. It’s not food if it arrived through the window of your car
    21. It’s not food if it’s called by the same name in every language (Think Big Mac, Cheetos or Pringles)
    37. The whiter the bread, the sooner you’ll be dead,
    57. Don’t get your fuel from the same place your car does.
    58. Do all your eating at a table
    64. Break the rules once in a while!

    Here’s some other helpful  resources that will help keep you on the road to healthy eating:

    Details on sugary drinks: http://fewersugarydrinks.org/

    Recipes for Health, NY Times: http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/health/series/recipes_for_health/index.html

    The ultimate source for what’s in foods (go here if you dare): http://www.calorieking.com/foods

    The Skinny on Obesity. A must view for every human: http://www.uctv.tv/skinny-on-obesity/

    Weight of the Nation on HBO- 4 hours of documentary free online: http://theweightofthenation.hbo.com/

    Dr. Dan Lieberman: http://nytimes.com/2012/06/06/opinion/evolutions-sweet-tooth.html

    Books: In Defense of Food and Food Rules by Michael Pollan; Why We Get Fat and What to do About It and Good Calories , Bad Calories by Gary Taubs

    Movies: Forks over Knives; Food Inc; Super Size Me; Sick, Fat, and Nearly Dead

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