Danny Abshire Authors Book on Natural Running

Posted by on Tuesday, November 16, 2010 @ 11:45 am | 5 Replies

natural-running-bookDanny Abshire, the co-founder and chief technical officer of Newton, has authored a new book titled Natural Running: The Simple Path to Stronger, Healthier Running. It is now available for online order just in time for the holiday gift-giving season.

“This is the single most important resource for people who want to enjoy running as nature intended while protecting themselves from unnatural surfaces,” says Abshire. “The book will teach you to run the barefoot way—with shoes—and become a more efficient, stronger and healthier runner.”

Danny is a passionate, lifelong runner who has spent 10 years designing and refining Newton Running shoes. As a longtime running form coach and injury expert, he has worked closely with thousands of athletes, from beginners to Olympic elites, helping them improve their running form and technique.

“Danny has worked with some of the best runners and triathletes in the history of endurance sports,” says Craig Alexander, two-time Ironman World Champion. “Just speaking to him will make you a better runner.”

In Natural Running, Abshire explains the posture, arm carriage, cadence, and land-lever-lift foot positioning that mimic the barefoot running style. Runners transition from heel striking to a midfoot or forefoot strike, which studies show is how the body evolved to run. So that runners can relearn this more natural running gait, Abshire offers an 8-week transition plan, complete with a tool kit of strength and form drills that build and maintain the musculature required for natural running.

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5 thoughts on “Danny Abshire Authors Book on Natural Running

  1. bill katovsky

    here’s my longish book review of  “natural running” 

    go here:

    http://minimalist-shoe.com/

    a snippet:

    Runners never had it so good. Finally. The shoes they are a-changin’. It’s tune in, turn on, zero drop.

    Natural Running offers the valuable middle ground that transitioning runners have been looking for. Much of this 156-page book is filled with advice on developing the natural running technique, form drills, self-assessment, and an eight-week transition plan that will put runners on the way to injury-free, and healthier running. Natural Running deserves a place on your bookshelf if you are someone willing to try something new, need a refresher course on proper running biomechanics, or simply want to know how to become a more efficient runner. And as a runner, you just might feel reborn

  2. David Dobson

    I have read the book. I love it! Packed with great information, but I have a question. Danny writes about forefoot orthotics for those with a Morton’s Foot type, which I definitely have. However, nobody here in middle Tennessee makes them. Everyone here says you need to support the rear of the foot, but like Danny writes about in the book my elevated first metatarsal is the culprit. I have found posture control insoles online, but am considering driving to Boulder for some customs! Any advice on what to do? Thank you for the book.

  3. Jennifer

    Hi David,
    Thanks for your comment on the book. At the Newton Running Lab in Boulder we make custom orthotics and also offer a mail order system. We mail you a foam impression kit and you step into this. From this impression, we make a postive cast of your foot and make a custom orthotic from this. We offer a super light-weight orthotic that weighs about the same as the sock liner that comes out of the shoes. It is a semi-flexible full length orthotic with correction in both the rearfoot and the foot. We have been making orthotics for 23 years and have really defined a system that balances both the rearfoot and the forefoot. If you are interested in receiving more information or to place an order, please call the Newton Running Lab and we would be glad to help you.
    303-494-0321
    thanks again, Jennifer

  4. Pablo Suarez

    Hi Sir Isaac,
    I am planning on taking the eight week transition plan and assessing the outcomes of it as part of my Biomechanics Analysis class project.

    Do I need to completely stop doing my own running and only do the running prescribed on the transition plan?

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