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Meet The Dogs Of Newton – Week 14 Daisy

Posted by on Thursday, September 5, 2013 @ 8:18 am | Leave a reply

DAISY1Hello my name is Daisy! I’m the newest member of the Newton Dog family.

I was born at the end of May and every week my biological Mom would send pictures of me getting bigger to my new mom in Colorado. This became known as “Woof Wednesday”. There was stiff competition between me and that hump day camel but I won out as the camel has gone to pasture & I am living it up at the Newton School of Running.

My mom thinks I’m wicked cute- but don’t let that fool you. I’m a bit of a sheep in wolfs clothing. I act soooo cute & then I flip my wolf switch where I run around like a crazy puppy and jump and nip at people. My mom keeps talking about taking me to class to get trained up… but I don’t think it’s much of a threat because I hang out at a school all day and nothing too authoritative happens there. They even have this cool display that has these neat socks hanging off of it that just sit there and wait for me to come by & play with them. My mom frowns upon this but Timmy thinks it’s funny- so I’m going to keep doing it.

Speaking of the School of Running, I even have my own fan club of ladies from the bank next door that come over to visit me. Come to think of it… I heard that the school was much less inhabited before I came and now there are people flocking to the door to hang out with me!

I am happy just hanging out but I love to go on adventures. The car isn’t my favorite place but it brings me to visit lots of cool stuff so I tolerate the ride. Once I adjust to the altitude I will be spending my mornings on runs with my mom. Times are tough this high up… I sure hope she brings me back to visit her people at sea level soon!

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Losing Weight to Triathlon: Fleet Feet Spokane’s Wade Pannell

Posted by on Tuesday, August 27, 2013 @ 2:14 pm | Leave a reply

FleetFeetWadeSix years ago, the owner of Fleet Feet Spokane, Wade Pannell, was living in Bozeman, Montana. The former competitive cyclist — in both road cycling and mountain biking — was working in resort real estate development and wining and dining more than he was working out. “I was sixty pounds heavier and needed to get fit,” says Pannell. “I would say I was big boned. It was a good excuse. But when I lost the weight, I realized I really wasn’t.” Finally, a friend with whom he grew up suggested he was out of shape and Pannell says, “I took it to heart.”

He began to run. “I couldn’t run a quarter mile without stopping and walking.” Yet, for Pannell, running took the least amount of time and was the easiest to do on the road when he was traveling for work. He also found the running community much more accepting than the cycling community, whose participants he says can be more competitive and critical. “In running you’re always in a pack and it’s much more community based.” He found the community he needed at Fleet Feet Bozeman. The store offered a plethora of programs to help people like Pannell get started. Pannell found this invaluable. And, he says, “Once I ran my first 5K, the old competitive juices were back.”

Back in shape, and 60 pounds lighter, Pannell began to enjoy riding again. From there, he set his sights on triathlon. “I ran the Boston Marathon in 2010, and in 2011, I completed my first Ironman Coeur D’Alene.”

While his training was picking up speed, Pannell’s work moved him to Spokane, Washington. Before leaving Bozeman, Pannell had been dabbling with the idea of opening a Fleet Feet or changing his line of work to training and helping people get fit. Once in Spokane, he and his wife decided that the city presented the perfect opportunity to open a Fleet Feet. They opened Fleet Feet Spokane last summer, in August 2012.

Spokane County has a population of roughly 450,000 people, and it only had one real specialty running store, explains Pannell.  “It was an underserved market and historically a very running focused community. We send about two or three high schools to national high school championships each year. Yet there was only one main specialty store.”

With an inventory focused on triathlon more than the average Fleet Feet, Pannell reached out to Newton Running in April, 2013. Ever since, Newton has been the store’s number 2 vendor with the Gravity leading the way, then the Isaacs and Pannell expects the Energy to do well, too. “I’ve been running in Newton for the last five years. Newton is not one of those brands most Fleet Feet’s open with. But we are very tri oriented. A few employees and myself coach a tri group and we were in a tri club with about 250 people. So for our audience it makes sense to find some brands with more of a tri focus.”

Newton’s message also aligned with that of Fleet Feet Spokane. “As we worked with training people and talking about minimalism and everything people need to do to become better runners, Newton’s education and biomechanical feedback was a nice segue for what we were doing and what we were about,” Pannell explains. “Not only has Newton given us fantastic support with their tech rep and corporate backup, but we’ve probably held five run clinics. Each time we get 20-30 people. I love the drills that Danny gives. And they brought in Chris Legh during Ironman Coeur d’Alene.”

Pannell says more than 50% of people who come in to his store probably should be introduced to Newton. “It’s the person who wants to run better, more naturally and improve their form, and who likes a lighter shoe or is a triathlete. All of those categories add up to a large portion of our customer base, so it’s a natural fit to bring out a Newton.”

And it’s not just triathletes and serious runners who like the shoes. Who is his unexpected customer? “We have the unexpected walkers who love Newtons. We fit a fair amount of people who are baby boomers who just want to be in comfortable footwear. I’m surprised at how many choose Newtons. The Energy will be great for that group.”

Personally, Pannell runs in the Distance. “If you want a shoe to be a stronger, better runner, I can’t think of a better shoe to give you that feedback than the Distance.” And for people who are worried about the transition and strengthening process that accompanies running in Newtons, he says, “You’ve lifted weights before right? Did it hurt? Well, if you’re going to increase your strength in your legs, you should have some muscular discomfort. It’s nothing to be scared of, just manage it properly.” He adds, “Once people commit, they get it. Even those who were skeptical about Newton are now very excited about running in them.”

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Meet The Dogs Of Newton – Week 13 Mr. Bo Jangles

Posted by on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 @ 7:58 am | Leave a reply

Mr. Bo JanglesSoooo.  My name is Mr. Bo Jangles.  They call be Bo, Bobo Head, MBJ and Sweet Man.   But my name is Mr. Bo Jangles.  I used to live under a dorm in Texas, and my to-be human would sneak me cans of Friskies under a bush.  I’d hiss and spit at her to show her how fierce I am, but I actually was pretty grateful.  Friskies is gross, but not as gross as University trash.  Soon thereafter, I was trapped by the Feral Cat Rescue Program and sent to live with my human.  She didn’t get to actually touch me for about three months; I was a wild cat after all, and she needed to know there would be no cute kitten fluffy snuggles.  We moved from Texas to Colorado five years ago, and now I spend all my time outside hunting the mountains, because I am a mountain lion.  I now have three humans; my favorite is the 18month-old who calls for me at dinner time, hollering “Boooooooooooooo” and kisses my back and tail.  Nobody knows how old I am, but I think I’m about eight.  My game weight is a svelte 15.9 lbs.

Likes:  Playing with creatures, oftentimes until they stop playing back.  I try to bring them in the house to share with my family – two snakes, four lizards, a mole, two mice, numerous birds (the best being a crazy magpie who my manhuman had to catch and release) and I’m spending this summer hunting a chipmunk family in the rock wall next door.  My humans say they’re responsible for eating the tomatoes, peppers and Brussels sprouts in the garden, so I’m looking to take them down.

Dislikes:  Having my belly petted.  Oddly, my shehuman seems to be magnetically attracted to my belly and tries to rub it constantly.  I tell her “no” by rabbit thumping her arm and biting her hand.  I’ve given her scars.  Grasshoppers I also don’t like.  I chase them, knock off a leg or two, and then eat them.  I don’t like them so much that I hork them back up again, usually in the house.

Points of Interest:  In one of my hunting forays, I was bit by a rattlesnake in my own backyard if you can believe that.  This is when I first met my Colorado Vet, who told my shehuman that I had a 50% chance of living or dying.  My face and neck swelled up like a bull frog, they had to stuff me in an acrylic box and gas me to pass me out and mend me.  I traded out four of my nine lives for that one.

I don’t actually get to come into the Newton Headquarters (other than for my photo shoot).  There’s some sort of company policy that dogs are allowed, but no cats, rabbits, ferrets, and so forth.  It’s because dogs are stupid and can’t spend the day by themselves without help – who needs an escort to go wee?  Pretty sure they’re the only ones…   Speaking of the photo shoot, if you’re ever coming in for one of these, know that there’s no Green Room or Craft Services table, and the photographer had the audacity to ask my shehuman if she could make me sit for the shoot.  Uh, no.

Last bit.  Although I’m a mountain lion of feral heritage, I am most comfortable at night sleeping between my two adult humans, on my own special pillow, with my face buried under Skipper the Bear.  I live the life of Riley.

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Training with KPeasey

Posted by on Thursday, August 15, 2013 @ 8:32 am | Leave a reply

By Kyle Pease

Brent and Kyle Pease are a team of brothers from Atlanta Georgia who compete together in athletic competitions — despite the fact that Kyle is relegated to a wheelchair, the result of Cerebral Palsy at birth. Brent, his older brother, pushes, pedals and paddles Kyle in 5k’s, 10k’s, marathons and triathlons to encourage those who witness their efforts that anything is possible. Through their foundation, The Kyle Pease Foundation, the duo raise funds to promote success for persons with disabilities by providing assistance to meet their individual needs through sports.  

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The following is from Kyle Pease’s blog: Where There is a Wheel There’s a Way:

I’ve been finding it difficult to fall asleep at night knowing that everything that Brent and I have been working toward is just around the corner. Up until this point, the greatest moment of our running career occurred recently at the Peachtree 10K, where we became the first assisted pair in the long history of the race to compete. It doesn’t get any better than the local crowds cheering our names as we traveled 6.2 miles through the familiar streets of our hometown Atlanta…or does it?

Now, just two months later, Brent and I will make Pease history as we try to have the word “Ironman” etched next to our names. For this, we will cover 140.6 miles through the water and roadways of rural Madison, Wisconsin — 2.4 miles of swimming, 112 miles on the bike, and finishing with the 26.2 mile marathon. Our goal is to break the 17-hour mark, which of course would make us forever IRONMEN. But even though Brent and I are hoping for a time between 14 and 16 hours, I’ll be honest anything this side of 16:59:59 is good enough. But that one second, is the second that differentiates an Ironman from a couple of guys who competed to truly becoming Ironmen.

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Now, as strange as some people find it, I have been training harder than I ever have in my life. Many people think that I have the easy part. Although Brent may agree with them while he’s paddling, pedaling and pushing me for 140.6 miles, it is important for me to be prepared for this, too. I have never sat on a bike for nearly nine hours and the average human body is not likely to fare well without proper preparation. Brent and I are training far longer and more often than we normally do in order to get both of our bodies used to the many miles and hours out on the course. I’ve been eating better than I normally do and have been trying to increase my liquid intake. I’m struggling a bit there, as I don’t really enjoy drinking water, but it’s very important to stay hydrated. It would be a shame if Brent was up to the task, but I wasn’t. It’s important to me to not let my brother and my teammate down.

My trainer, Matthew Rose, (yes I have a trainer) tells me to visualize the shoot. The thought of 45,000 screaming fans lining the shoot at the end of the race is something I just can’t imagine, despite his efforts to help me mentally imagine what it will be like. That is the golden carrot hanging just in front of me that will motivate and inspire me and subsequently inspire Brent to the finish line.

Yet, there’s one very important thing for my readers and our fans to remember, becoming an Ironman is not and never will be for or about Brent and me. It’s about our Foundation and the people who we are hoping to inspire: People who see what we are about to accomplish and believe that anything is possible through our efforts.

We are very proud of the Kyle Pease Foundation and take great pleasure in seeing the looks on the faces of the athletes who compete with us. It is exciting to know that through the efforts of a few, we have impacted the lives of many. Although Brent and I will be thrilled to wear the Ironman medal around our necks on the evening of September 8th, we really know that the medal symbolically hangs from the necks of all those friends, fans, athletes and sponsors of the Kyle Pease Foundation. We know that through their continued inspiration and efforts that the only thing that will not be humanly possible is finishing in a second more than 16:59:59. Off to Wisconsin!

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Meet The Dogs Of Newton – Week 12 Frankie

Posted by on Tuesday, August 13, 2013 @ 10:09 am | Leave a reply

Frankie week 12Hello, my name is Frankie. My humans rescued me from the Boulder Humane Society about 7 years ago after spending much of my first year roaming the streets of south Denver and I have been thankful ever since! I’m not exactly sure what breeds I am so your guess is as good as mine….any guesses? I’m dying to know!

Likes: My favorite activity is chasing the deer and wild turkeys around our house, but I will settle for running, hiking, or swimming with my humans. I also love going to work at the Newton headquarters where I get treats and snuggles throughout the day. If you are ever in need of a hug, come on over.

Dislikes: Thunder! And fireworks! I hate the Fourth of July and I’m a big scaredy-cat during thunder storms. I usually take cover in bathrooms with my tail between my legs.

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Thad Beatty for Kona Inspired

Posted by on Wednesday, April 24, 2013 @ 2:57 pm | Leave a reply

Thad Beatty, guitarist for country stars Sugarland, wants to inspire an to be inspired. Over the past couple of years, Thad has gone from a musician on the road who was 75 lbs. overweight, eating poorly and simply unhealthy. Then he decided to make a change.

In the last year, apart from becoming an Ironman, Thad has become a part of the Newton family. He’s also a member of the Ironman Foundation – Newton Running Ambassador Triathlon Team as well as an ambassador for Ironman’s Kona Inspired.

The Kona Inspired program provides seven slots for the Ironman World Championship driven by aspirational stories and voted on by the triathlon community. The program returns this year as a global opportunity with the support of the Ironman Foundation.

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Race Preview: Ironman Texas

Posted by on Monday, April 22, 2013 @ 10:49 am | Leave a reply

Ironman Texas

by: Alex Weber

I chose to race Ironman Texas, first and foremost, because I wanted my first ironman race to be in my home state of Texas.  I get sentimental with races sometimes and felt like I wanted this accomplishment to be close to home.  The course had a reputation for being flat and spectator friendly, which I was also really excited about!  If you are from Texas, or anywhere in the south, it is especially easy to travel to the race and there are lots of options for hotels and restaurants nearby.  Even if you are from out of town, IAH international airport is only about 30 minutes away from the race venue. This race is a great excuse for out of town athletes to experience Texas and all the state has to offer.

Check In

Check in for the race was very organized with lots of volunteers.  Everything was clearly labeled and explained, which a relief was since this was my first 140.6. The race packets also had lots of great “goodies” inside.  Keep in mind that the expo/check in is located outside though which can get pretty warm (May in Texas).  If you are racing but still want to do some shopping at the expo, I would suggest going earlier in the day and taking fluids with you to stay hydrated.

Swim Preview

The swim course was pretty simple with only a few turns, therefore only having a few opportunities for bottlenecks with the swimmers.  The first turn is about ¾ of a mile out, leaving time for the athletes to spread out and get in a groove before having to take a sharp turn.  The first turn was the only congested part of the swim course.  Beware that once athletes take the last turn into the canal part of the swim, the water can get pretty choppy since the canal is not very wide.  However, it is most likely that the athletes will be spread out enough by then to eliminate some of the waves.  Also, athletes should plan on warm water temperatures and most likely not needing a wetsuit if they feel comfortable swimming without one.  The course is only one loop which is much easier than having to do two loops that require more energy to enter and exit the water multiple times.

[CLICK FOR SWIM COURSE MAP]

Bike Preview

The bike course is also one large loop, with sufficient markers and volunteers stationed at possible points of confusion.  The majority of the course is flat and fast, which allows athletes to get comfortable in their aero positions and race at a good pace.  It is very important to remember fluids on the bike course as the weather has the potential to be very hot.  Aid stations are located every ten miles with sufficient water, energy drinks and food for the athletes but it is important that athletes always have enough water on them.

I felt pretty good on the bike up until around mile 90 when my body hit a little wall.  In order to stay focused and encouraged, I started to treat the aid stations as small “goals” that I had to reach.  By mentally giving myself shorter goals along the long course, I was able to distract myself and keep pushing to the transition area. The course is not very spectator friendly for those who parked in the race venue area at the Woodlands Waterway because traffic makes it hard for spectators to get in/out with cars.  The best place for spectators to see the athletes is at the beginning of the course (before athletes leave the Waterway) and when they return to T2.  A significant amount of the course winds through quiet, country roads with very few cars or people, thus it is important that athletes have enough nutrition and bike maintenance supplies.  However, other parts of the course are on busier roads where the only the shoulder or right lane is blocked off for the riders.

[CLICK FOR BIKE COURSE MAP]
[CLICK HERE FOR BIKE COURSE ELEVATION PROFILE]

Run Preview

The run was definitely the best part of the race.  The course was three loops and very spectator friendly.  Part of the course runs along the canal while the back half winds through neighborhoods.  The course was pretty flat and very well marked, with no confusion for the athletes and aid stations promptly stationed at every mile.  To my surprise, I felt pretty good on the run, giving the credit to the awesome people out there cheering and my Newton shoes of course!  The last mile before the finish was amazing with the huge crowd and winding finish, definitely making all of the hard work worth it in the end.

[CLICK FOR RUN COURSE MAP]
[CLICK HERE FOR RUN COURSE ELEVATION PROFILE]

Transition Preview

Transition was well organized and clearly marked for the athletes.  Lots of volunteers were available in the changing tents which was helpful.   I actually took quite a long break in T2 and had a quick chat with some of the volunteers while I ate my peanut butter sandwich (15 minutes to be exact!).  They were more than happy to have the company in the tent.  Always be sure to thank the fantastic volunteers along the way!

Summary & Tips for Spectators

The whole race venue is great for spectators, with the Marriott hotel located right next to the expo and lots of good restaurants and a movie theater right in the area.  However, trying to drive around on race day could pose problems for spectators.  The bike course uses one of the only roads that leads into the Woodlands Waterway area (where all of the race activities occur) so spectators could find themselves in slow moving traffic if they want to leave/return during the race.  I would suggest spectators parking in the race venue area and planning on staying in the Waterway area all day.  Spectators could bring a bike to ride around the course area in order to cheer on the athletes.  Lots of restaurants, shopping and a movie theater will provide entertainment while the athletes are racing.

Overall, Ironman Texas was a great experience and I would highly recommend it to anyone that is interested in racing.  It was a great venue, volunteers, course and spectators and I would definitely race it again.

Have you raced Ironman Texas? What did you think?

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Craig Alexander on ESPN Australia’s Aussies Abroad

Posted by on Friday, August 31, 2012 @ 11:00 am | Leave a reply

As we approach both the 2012 Ironman 70.3 World Championship in Las Vegas as well as the big daddy in Kona it’s a good time to take a look at some of the back story on the man who currently holds both titles. As the man known as “Crowie” to his legions of fans, Craig Alexander is a true gentleman and ambassador for the burgeoning sport of triathlon and this video tells us a bit more about who the real Craig Alexander is.

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Monday Race Hangover

Posted by on Tuesday, June 12, 2012 @ 12:00 pm | Leave a reply

This weekend saw a ton of triathlon goings-on in the Newton family! Craig Alexander hit the bricks in his first race since his epic victory at Ironman Melbourne in March at Ironman 70.3 Eagleman in Maryland. The reigning Ironman (BOTH distances) World Champ was out of the water with the lead pack in a time of  23:17. He followed this up by laying down a blazing bike split of 2:03:57, which came on a flat but windy course that gave many athletes trouble. Coming out of T2 25 seconds down on the race leader, Craig and his Newtons did what they do best and took control of the race by posting a 1:15:07 half-marathon split for a winning time of 3:44:57.

A few hundred miles to the West, Newton pro Rachel Joyce was taking on brutal race conditions at Ironman 70.3 Kansas. After post the second fastest women’s swim time of the day in very choppy conditions, Rachel completely dominated the rast of the race. She posted the fastest women’s bike split by 7:11 (2:22:10) as well as the fastest women’s run split (1:21:21). These splits combined found Rachel just shy of a whopping 23 minutes in front of the second place finisher!

Holding down the Newtonian contingent at Ironman 70.3 Kansas on Sunday was part of Newton’s crack legal team, Thom W. On a day that saw winds kicking up a few white caps on Clinton Lake as well as record temps on the bike and run course made for a race that was a bit less than perfect. In the end though, Thom was super happy that he made it through such tough conditions and notching off his 2nd 70.3!

There were three Newtonians who joined Craig at Eagleman as well. Scott Burrow, Steve Johnson and Andrew Maxwell all set off into the tough heat, humidity and breeze. After flatting during the swim (“How?” you ask? In high heat tires/tubes that are pushing the limits of their inflation can expand and burst), Scott went on to have a solid race. Taking a break from his duties at the Newton Running Lab here in Boulder, Steve had a killer day, winning his age group with an awesome 4:03:47 which punched his ticket to Kona in October. Congrats Steve!

Big props to all who raced in Newtons this weekend!

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