Tag Archives: Jerry Lee

  • Food on the Run with "The Newton Chef" Justin Cogley

    Salmon Kale Sandwich & Green Juice

    Delicious After Run Meal or Snack Delicious After Run Meal or Snack

    Our Newton Chef, Justin Cogley (Food & Wine’s Best New Chef 2013).  Has developed a great recipe to help you recover this summer with a high protein and tasty snack which will taste great after any run.

    Here's the recipe.

    Chef tip.

    With a few of these easy recipes you can make a simple sandwich into something refreshing and tasty. I used Salmon since it is going strong right now, but you could sub. Halibut, Chicken, or even Avocado.

     Pine nut mayonnaise-

    1/2 cup raw pine nuts, soaked in hot water for 2 hours

    1/2 cup of the soaking liquid

    2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil

    1 1/2 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

    In a blender, combine the pine nuts, water, olive oil, and lemon juice and blend until smooth. around 3 min. The mixture will thicken as it sits. Use or store in refrigerator for up to 5 days.

    Raw kale, carrot, golden raisin slaw

    3 bunches of kale, stem off, washed, dried and sliced

    1 carrot peeled and sliced thin

    Sesame dressing

    3 TBSP rice vinegar

    2 TBSP dark sesame oil

    1 TBSP canola or light olive oil

    splash of soy sauce

    2 TBSP sesame seeds

    1/4 cup golden raisins

    Mix all together to form a broken vinaigrette. Check seasoning. Next fold in the Golden Raisins ( adding the golden raisins adds some nice sweetness)

    Since melons are just coming into season. This quick drink is very refreshing.

    Melon, Celery, Ginger, Apple

    2 Cups chopped french melon (or your favorite)

    1 Granny smith apple, peeled and chopped

    2 celery stalk

    small knob of ginger ( peeled and chopped)

    Chef tip. Peeling ginger with a spoon works so well!

    1/2 cup fresh OJ

    juice of one lime

    12 mint leaves

    1 cup crushed ice

    Put the first four ingredients through a juicer. (alternately blend in a high speed blender and strain) Next, add the juice into a small pitcher and pour in fresh OJ and the lime juice.

    Crush the mint leaves with the ice and add to the pitcher. Stir and enjoy.

    Find out more about Justin here: https://chefsroll.com/justincogley or follow him on instagram to see where he's running today: https://instagram.com/justincogley/




  • Just Tri It!

    As you contemplate your New Year’s Resolution, consider taking inspiration from amateur triathlete Dan Stubleski.


    While you contemplate your New Year’s Resolutions, consider taking inspiration from Dan Stubleski, who didn’t run, swim or bike competitively until he took up triathlons four years ago at age 34. Although he now rides with a local team (Fraser Bicycle Team Green), he doesn’t have a coach and he works full time. Still, this year, he placed first in his division (35-39) at the Ironman World Championship in Kona, Hawaii and he was the overall top amateur finisher, in a time of 8:50:22. We caught up with him recently at his home in Washington, Michigan, where he lives with his wife (who he describes as “the best Sherpa EVER!!!!”) and two kids, ages 12 and 10.


    Before you started doing triathlons had you ever raced running? No, no racing before. I just ran for fun. I was competitive in team sports.

    Did you bike or race bikes? My first race was the South Maui Triathlon in 2011.

    What about swimming?  I knew how to swim, for fun, but did not start really swimming until I signed up for the South Maui Tri. I started swimming at the Romeo High School pool.

    So triathlons are quite a bit different than playing basketball. How did you start doing triathlons? Well, I bought my first road bike because I was into watching the Tour De France and thought that riding might be fun. I bought my first road bike and loved it. I discovered Triathlon when looking for a bike race during a trip to Maui with my wife in June of 2011. We were already booked to go and I wanted to bring my bike. I thought it would be cool to do a race while I was there, but could only find triathlon and not just bike racing. I figured why not? I’ll try it!

    You came 2nd in your first triathlon, the South Maui Tri, which was Olympic Distance,  and then went straight to the IRONMAN Steelhead 70.3 in Michigan…were you hooked after the first one and just decided to go for it? Oh heck yeah, I was hooked! I figured I did well at the Olympic distance, and loved it, and Steelhead was within driving distance, so why not?

    When did you set your sites on a full IRONMAN? I did not set my sites on IRONMAN until after I completed the 70.3 (which actually wasn’t a true 70.3 because the swim was cancelled).

    Looking at your resume, it looks like you performed well from the get go and then just got stronger? Were you surprised at your performance?  I was surprised at my performance in Maui. I really just wanted to finish. I never expected to finish second overall! It wasn’t until after like my 3rd or 4th race that I stopped being surprised and knew that triathlon racing must be my thing.

    Was IRONMAN Texas your first full? Yes, Texas 2013.

    When did you set your sites on Kona? After my 2012 race season—I raced well in 2012 and set my sites on a full IRONMAN and qualifying for Kona 2013.

    In 2013, you placed 2nd in your age group and 26th overall at Kona. How did that race rank for you in your list of experiences? I think I have to say my best race experience was Kona 2013, my first time racing there. There is nothing like it! Just the feeling of being in Kona was awesome—the crazy, exciting atmosphere. Just standing on the pier. Crossing the finish line for the first time in Kona, the feeling is indescribable!


    What were your goals heading to Kona this year? My goal was to win! Isn’t that always the goal? Lol! I also wanted to improve on my marathon time.

    What were you worried about going in? If I could improve on my time from last year.

    Did you know you were the first amateur? I did know I was in first. It was close for most of the race. Toward the end though I knew I had a little time on the second place guy.

    Obviously, you won, so the race went well. What were the highlights? Well, I had a bad swim. I picked a spot that proved to be not good! It was crowded. Everybody wants to be first so everybody wants to start the swim up front. The spot I chose was crowded for most of the swim. My favorite part was the bike. I love to ride. I got a new Specialized Shiv this season and sometimes I just can’t get out of the saddle!!! My bike was descent, considering there was a head wind heading to Hawi and pretty much all the way back from Hawi! I had a PR on the run, 2:58:19. I was excited, happy, proud! I couldn't believe I had done it!

    Was your family there to watch? This year just my wife, but last year for my first Kona, my wife and kids were all there.

    And you raced in Newtons? Yes I did. I raced in the Elites, the green ones. When I first started wearing Newtons I wore Distance S. I sometimes still train in them.

    Why Newtons? Honestly, because Crowie [Newton athlete/triathlete Craig Alexander] wears them! That is how I discovered them. I was wearing another brand for my 2011 season and they were too wide, sloppy. I knew that before my 2012 season I needed to find a new brand. I saw Crowie in Newtons and looked them up and thought I’d give them a try. I have been hooked on them ever since. Love them. The guys that work in the Newton tent at the race venues got to know my wife because we were in there shopping so much!

    So, why do you do what you do? I do it because I love it. I love to exercise. It makes me feel alive! Lol, most people don’t understand that!

    What do people think back home? Everyone is excited. Everyone is happy for me and they want to hear my Kona story, which I am happy to tell!

    What’s next? Well, I had a lot to think about and consider. I kind of wanted to go pro, but with the changes to the pro race that Ironman made, it really doesn’t make sense for me. All of the sold out races that I could have entered and close to home races are no longer pro races. So, I am going to stay amateur.


    Do you have any advice for newcomers to triathlon? For the newcomers in the sport, start slow and enjoy the journey. It takes a lot of dedication to do this sport. It gets a little easier the fitter you get.

    What about any New Year’s Resolutions? My goal for the year is to go faster each time I race. To win again in Kona would be awesome!! We will see. I think I can still improve in all areas.

  • Home Victory

    Visualize what you want to happen in a race, and as Detroit native Mike Andersen discovered, it might just come true.


    For professional runners, we know there are moments that you dream of—running in the Olympics, winning a big event like the New York marathon and, winning a race on your home turf, in front of friends and family. The latter is the victory that took Mike Andersen by surprise when he won the 37th Detroit Free Press / Talmer Bank marathon on Sunday, October 19th.  “You have to plan a little bit, but you don’t really expect for it to happen,” he said of his run.

    For Andersen, who won the race in a personal best of 2:24.54, it was his second time running this race (he placed third in 2011) and only his fourth time running a marathon. As a member of Newton Running Elite Andersen wasn’t confident that the race would go in his favor since his training runs have been limited in recent months. He works full time at the Running Lab in Brighton, Michigan, coaches cross country at nearby Milford High School, and he and his wife (also a Michigan native), welcomed a daughter into the world last March. Although the 27-year-old Andersen’s time still isn’t quite fast enough to reach his goal of qualifying for the Olympic Marathon Trials in 2016 (he’ll need to run a 2:18 or faster), Andersen says he’s on the right path of dropping time.

    We caught up with him this week to hear the details of his win.

    “The craziest part about the race is that I didn’t take the lead until mile 26 and I wasn’t in the lead group. From step one, I was in third place. The first two guys went out fast and I just focused on my pace, my rhythm. At mile 15, I was 2 minutes back …at mile 19, I was down to a minute and 15 seconds, and I still couldn’t see the leaders. The next mile, I cut it down another 30 seconds and I hadn’t changed pace. I just stayed consistent.

    I had some friends out spectating and I kept asking about fourth place, I was worrying about that more than winning.

    At Mile 22, you come off of Belle Isle and the gap was now down to 45 seconds. Here, we were running along the riverfront and there are a lot of turns between mile 22 and mile 24. So, I still couldn’t see anything.

    When we finally came back to a straightaway, I could see second place and I closed that down quickly. I was 29 seconds back. I could just see first place now on straightaways. A former coach of mine was biking the course and he would pop up from a side road and get a count on first and yell out encouragement like ‘your only 20 seconds down.’

    The race finishes with a right hand turn up a hill that takes you to 26, and then an immediate left hand turn for the final .2 miles. My old coach said if you’ve got a move go now, he’s tired. The last thing he said is ‘7 seconds.’ I thought in 7 seconds I can be right there. I saw him [Zachary Ornelas] at the hill and I made up my mind to pass him quickly and go for it. As I passed him, he gave me a look of ‘nice job,’ he was a defending champion and had gone through some injuries of his own.

    So then my only focus was to turn left and go as hard as I could. I glanced to see how far back he was, and this crazy elation came over me for the last 100 meters. I was fist pumping and starting to cry.

    I kept thinking, stay on your feet. I had 50 meters to go and I couldn’t believe I was going to win the race. Getting to break the tape, it really was overwhelming—to test your self and have it come out perfectly, it’s amazing.

    My mom had my daughter (who was born in March of 2014) at home, but my wife Katie was there and my dad, too. Before anyone came into view near the finish, the announcer said, ‘the defending champion is about to make the turn. Oh wait, we’ve had a change,’ and as they said my name my wife started screaming. They ushered her up to the front to greet me at the finish line. It was one of those things where she was probably less surprised than I was. You know how you’re your own worst enemy. She said, ‘you’re going to do great. You’re fine, you did everything.’ But it’s hard to believe that for yourself.”


    What’s next?

    “This race was a huge confident boost. I have PRed every time, but I keep learning more about myself. I was definitely on top of fueling and figured a lot of things out training wise. I didn’t train as many miles or as crazy as the others. But I was more efficient with my time because I’m a dad now and working.

    It’s not about the watch, but figuring out where your limits are and being able to test them. To get to an Olympic trial time, I think if there is a race where there are more people at my level they may pull me along and help me drop time. And then if I can find a 4-month chunk to train more seriously that may lead me to a faster time.

    Marathons to me are still crazy, it takes a lot mentally to prepare for one. I don’t want to rush into the next one.”

    We know you coach high school kids, what do you tell them?

    “I am probably the more empathetic one (of the team’s three coaches), who puts things in perspective. The biggest thing I show is that it’s not just one day that makes you a good runner it’s an investment over time. Maybe someone isn’t at the front, but over a year you can move up by putting in an honest effort.

    Personally, I don’t have bad races because I don’t think of races as this negative thing, I think of racing as a reward for all the hard work you do. Running in general is like that and there are so many pressures in life, running is the last place you should be stressed out. If you allow yourself to relax and enjoy it you will probably go faster than if you’re concentrating on every single step.

    You also have to allow yourself to visualize success or it won’t happen. If you visualize it, it’s more likely to happen. At the Bolder Boulder, my Newton teammate Nik Schweikert was reading “A Champion’s Mind.” Three weeks ago, I texted Nik and said what’s the name of that book, I’d like to get some motivation. Nik sent me the book and that’s where I got the idea to visualize success. Even though I’m here in Michigan, the Newton team still played a big part in letting me run that well.”

    And what Newtons did you wear?

    “The Distance III, that’s what I reach for pretty much every day. They offer a nice compromise between weight and protection when you get to the later miles.”

  • Officially An IRONMAN!

    The  2014 IRONMAN® World Championship took place last Saturday (October 11), and among the more than 2,100 contenders, was America’s most decorated Olympic short-track speedskater, Apolo Ohno. Finding himself in a very different setting than the 40-second sprint races he was accustomed to as a short-track speedskater, the 32-year-old Ohno had put in the hours of training, but hit the course with only one IRONMAN 70.3 and one sprint triathlon under his belt. That didn’t stop him from finishing in 9.52.27 [1:00:29 swim, 5:07:15 swim, 3:36:41 run], blowing away his own expectations for the day.

    Friends say Ohno has the ability to step into a very different gear when he competes, and he did just that in Kona. And just like in his speedskating races, his dad was there in Kona to cheer him on.

    We spoke with Ohno before the race and then we caught up with him again, after the race.

    2014 Ironman World Championship

    When we asked you about what might be the toughest part of the race, you said getting through the point everyone talks about, when you think you might quit. Did that happen?

    Never. It was very strange. Throughout my entire training, people had told me that you’re going to go through these emotions, and start asking yourself if you can do this. But in my entire life of speedskating, I never woke up and didn’t want to go to practice. So, I didn’t allow that to enter my brain on Saturday. I focused on what I had to do now, at that moment. I was very much in a fighter mentality and ready for anything.

    I ran through options in my mind. I knew I couldn’t defeat the island—option 1 would be for me to defeat the island and that wasn’t going to happen. Option 2 was for me to be defeated and I wasn’t going to let that happen. Or option 3, I could strive to be one with the island—you’re out there all alone and you’re so tired and you have nothing left and for me it was a very spiritual experience.

    At the start they used these tribal drums before the first wave went off. It was this really cool moment for me and it stayed with me throughout the entire run.

    You knew running would be the toughest challenge for you, but you finished in 3:36.41. An impressive finish considering you did 3:25 in the New York marathon a few years back, without the swim and bike.

    I knew this was the big stage and I had to give everything I had. The swim was consistent and on the bike I was strong. The run was the most difficult. I think it [my time] would have been better, but at mile 25, I had to take a quick detour [a bathroom dash].

    I was very happy with the run but the place I had to take my mind was very interesting. I went through some interesting conversations in my head. I knew I was going to hit the wall, I knew that would happen and I knew sometimes at those moments you can summon the most strength. It was super intense, the fight I had to give, not letting down, telling myself, ‘I can do this. I am going to be strong.’ Crossing the finish line was a very cool moment.

    What words did your coach, Newton athlete, Paula Newby-Fraser, have for you before the race?

    Before the race, Paula said, your initials “AAO” stand for, “Adapt, adjust, overcome.”

    How does this rank in your experiences as an athlete?

    Everybody was so incredible and I feed off of people’s energy. It was uplifting and inspiring. While I was out there it got pretty emotional for me, very spiritual, very deep, my brain and body were cooked. There is no other place on the planet that you can experience these things while doing something like that.

    This is something I can take with me for the rest of my life and I’m very proud to have this, I have it for life.

    How did the triathlete community compare to other athletic experiences you’ve had?

    I will tell you the endurance world and the triathlete world is very unique. You have to jump in and experience it for yourself, it’s so exciting. I was very blessed to be welcomed with open arms.

    How did the finish feel? Did people recognize you?

    There were so many people. It was amazing as I was finishing, everyone shouting ‘Apolo, Apolo.’ And then I went back and saw my friend finish, and then I saw the countdown to midnight, I got the whole deal. I didn’t want to miss a minute.

    After the race, do you still love your Newton’s?

    I’m wearing them. They are awesome.

    In 2013, former NFL wide receiver Hines Ward, completed the IRONMAN. He encouraged you to do it. Who are you going to encourage to follow in your footsteps?

    I don’t know. That’s a good question. I set the bar. I’ll get someone else.

    Now what?

    A week in Hawaii—I’ll do some work, and get my legs recovered and just take it in. Spend some time with my journal— the experience was once in a lifetime.

  • Kona For Kenny!

    It was a plan six years in the making, Newton Running Company employee Kenny Withrow wanted to qualify for Kona, and he wasn't going to stop until he got there. On August 3rd, Kenny blew through the field at Ironman Boulder to grab his slot for the big dance. How does a person execute a plan so flawlessly when so much is on the line? We weren't sure either, so we sat him down and asked him a few questions.


    Q: How long have you had your eyes on a Kona slot for? What was your motivation for getting there?

    A: I've been wanting to race Kona for 6 years now. IRONMAN Boulder was my 3rd IRONMAN. I sat down with my Coach (Eric from EK Endurance Coaching) last October and said "I wanna go to Kona". Since that conversation every swim, bike and run has been geared towards IRONMAN Boulder and snagging a Kona slot.

    Q: What do you think will be the hardest part of the race mentally for you?

    A: Being patient during the bike. Knowing that the race will really begin once I get my feet on the ground.

    Q: What shoe have you been training in? And what shoe will you be racing in?

    A: My shoe of choice post IRONMAN Boulder was the AHA. Leading up to Kona I've been training in the Distance III and Distance Elite. My weapon of choice for Kona. Drum roll please.......The Limited Edition Distance III ;) So Fresh!

    Q: Number one thing running through your head when you’re mid-way through the bike/run on race day?

    A: The Swim: Is that a shark?

    The Bike: I swear that was a shark!

    The Run: "How far until the next aid station?"

    Q:What are your main concerns racing in Kona?

    A: The humidity!


    For more information on Kenny, check out his fundraising page -https://www.rallyme.com/rallies/886/kenny-to-kona

  • Bachelorettes Gone Wild

    Part Two

    R2R2R_2 Sabina, Kara, Cody from nearest to farthest

    Question: How did this not so average bachelorette party come about?

    Kara: This is 100% Cody's idea. Don't let her blame it on me. She came up with the idea and we all kind of ignored it at first...but she's not someone who likes to be ignored. After hearing about it for a while, she told us one day that she found a great price on flights so we all caved and booked right then.

    Cody: One morning a couple months back I nonchalantly said, “we should run the Grand Canyon.” Working at Newton, it’s easy to talk almost everyone into something crazy, so both Sabina and Kara were like “YES!” and then we booked a flight later that night.

    Sabina: It was Cody's idea... AND I am easily convinced when it comes to any adventure! We were all sitting at our desk one day and she came up with this crazy idea and within the next 10 minutes our tickets were booked! The best part about all of this is on our very first training run she looks back at us and says “I don’t really like trails or lots of climbing....”

    *Apparently we remember past events a little differently....

    Question: Do you have any concerns about this trip?

    Kara: Serious concerns? No. My concerns are more along the lines of: 'will we be functional enough the next day for brunch and mimosas?' and 'how many times will Cody and Sabina use hashtag language instead of real words before I snap at them?'

    Cody: My main concern would be that I really prefer running on flat terrain, that is paved. Kara and Sabina have both told me that I need to get over that…quickly.

    Sabina: Yes! Cody and I will start singing lyrics to Spice Girls, and Kara will push both of us off a cliff! Oh and the fact we may run out of Tostito Peperoni pizza rolls within the first 10 miles... These are all real concerns of mine.

    If you missed the intro to Bachelorettes Gone Wild...check it out here!



    More than 3,000 athletes will take on IRONMAN Boulder in our hometown on Sunday, August 3 and Newton Running will be there to help them Run Better – especially when they really need the support: at mile 20 of the run course.

    We’re inviting athletes’ friends, family members, coaches or other supporters to record a short, personalized “video cheer.” We’ll play the video, triggered to an athlete’s race chip, on a jumbo screen at mile 20 of the run course – just when they’re digging deep and doing some soul-searching to keep it going those last 6.2 miles.

    If you’re in Boulder for race weekend and know someone racing, come visit the Newton #RunForIt video booth and record a FREE cheer video for an athlete. Here’s the schedule:

    Tuesday, July 29 10am-6pm Newton Running Lab
    Wednesday, July 30 10am-6pm Newton Running Lab
    Thursday, July 31 9am-5pm IRONMAN Boulder ExpoBoulder High School1604 Arapahoe Ave, Boulder, CO
    Friday, August 1 9am-5pm IRONMAN Boulder ExpoBoulder High School1604 Arapahoe Ave, Boulder, CO
    Saturday, August 2 9am-5pm IRONMAN Boulder ExpoBoulder High School1604 Arapahoe Ave, Boulder, CO




  • Going the Distance

    Brenda Carawan is not your typical runner. But then again, most people who thrive in races that average 100 miles on the road, are not your every day runner. The Texas native, who has a 100-mile PR of 16:33, has had top finishes at the Spartathlon Ultra Race (153 miles) in Greece and California’s Badwater Ultramarathon (135 miles). She’s been first overall female at North Carolina’s Graveyard 100-mile and Florida’s Keys 100 Ultramarathon, amongst other top finishes. And yet, the 38-year-old Carawan didn’t compete, or even run, in high school or college. Instead, she was an aerobics instructor who found her workout wasn’t cutting it anymore, so she started to run.


    First, I did the Austin marathon in 1996. I was 19. It took me 6 hours. I came in third from last. In 1997, I did the same race in 4.5 hours. From there, I kept running and I never stopped.


    When I moved to Virginia in 2000, I needed a way to meet people. The big thing there was triathlons. I was like I can run and I have swum before and surely I can ride a bike. I did a couple of sprint triathlons. I always needed to finish so I could get to the finish line party.

    In 2004, I signed up for an Ironman in North Carolina, even though it wasn’t trademarked that. My family flew in to see me do this race. The race day came and I missed the bike cut-off by over an hour maybe two hours. I got to the transition area and they said you’re disqualified. I said, my family has flown here, can I give you my timing chip and finish the run and they said ‘yes.’ It still took me 5 hours. But I caught enough people to not finish dead last in the whole race.

    The next day I was embarrassed. I was supposed to be an Ironman and none of that happened. I went to REI and found this documentary called Running On the Sun about Badwater Ultramarathon. People were throwing up, crying and passing out. One guy had his toenails surgically removed, and I’m looking at this thinking this is what I’m meant to do. I will suffer but it looks like a lot of fun. This is the bucket list race.


    Spartathlon 2013

    In 2011, I got invited. You have to be invited and only 90 people get invited. To do Badwater, you have to have completed at least three 100-mile races within a calendar year and you have to submit a running resume. It’s not enough to have just finished three ultras. You have to have done well.

    Preparing for and running Badwater, that just set the whole ultra scene for me. I fell in love with the adrenaline rush of getting ready for the races and pushing the limit physically and mentally. That will always be my dream race. The traditional Badwater is unique to any other race on the planet because of the climate, the temperatures and the solitude of not seeing anything for miles and miles.


    Graveyard 100 2012

    I run up to 130 miles the week before races and do about 5-6 weeks of 100-plus miles. For the Spartathlon last September—a 153-mile race—I got up to 150 miles a week in training.



    My coach is a huge proponent of Newton. She kept telling me about these shoes. Finally, leading up to my second 100-miler, I tried them and then I went and ran 20 miles. It was the most wonderful run I have ever had. I realized this is the fit that I need and I have never used another brand since. I stopped having injuries. My form got better. I attended the Newton coach training school so I could learn more about the science and the drills behind the product. It’s not just a shoe, there’s an actual science behind the shoe. That’s what is unique about Newton and that’s what I fell in love with, the science.

    Going into 2012, I had my fourth 100-mile race. I was the first female and I won in 16 hours and 33 minutes. I went from running a 19:50 to a 16:33. I wholeheartedly believe it was because of what I learned from Newton and my coach. It’s those two variables that made a difference.

    I decided to write Newton to be on the pro team. But every year the pro field was closed. Then the guy in charge of the pros said why don’t you contact Stephen Gartside who runs the elite team. Up until late 2012 the elite team had been closed to only people living in Boulder, Colorado [home of Newton headquarters]. 2013 is the first time Newton has let people outside of Boulder join the team. So Gartside and I ran together a few times, then in January 2014, he said “Welcome to the team!”


    Winning Nove Colli 125_miles 2014

    Before I switched to Newton’s exclusively, yes, I had injuries. I tore my soleus, I had a partial tear in my hamstring, and there were good chunks of time where the nerve endings in my metatarsal were inflamed so I had to water run because I couldn’t run on land. Between my Newtons and my coach making sure I don’t over train, I have had no injuries or blisters. One pair of shoes no blisters.

    At Spartathlon in Greece, they plop you down in a wheelchair when you finish and take you to the medical tent to tend to your feet. They took pictures of my feet because there was nothing wrong with them. That’s the way it should be.


    Winning Keys 100 2013

    When I’m running I drink juice, Gatorade, shakes. I do no solid foods at all regardless of the distance. Occasionally, I might ask for 2 or 3 Pringle chips. But when I say that, I legitimately mean 3 chips, if you hand me 10, I will eat 3 and put the rest on the ground.

    When the race is over the best food I have ever had was in Italy. No other place to eat on the planet than in Italy. To stuff my face with prosciutto, wine, and pasta, that is just the closest thing to heaven that could possibly be on this planet for me.


    I really just enjoy the open road. It puts me in a good place mentally when I’m out there by myself. There are days that I start crying when I’m out there because I ‘m just in love with that moment of the road and me, it’s an intense love affair with the road.


    My coworkers generally think I’m crazy. My desk becomes a confession stand where people feel compelled to confess that they haven’t worked out or that they ate unhealthy. They know what I’ve done and it’s like they’re seeking forgiveness for not having done their workout when they know what I’m doing.


    I like to listen to music. I have everything from Julio Iglesias in Spanish to classical piano to Eminem to Annie Lennox. I have the full spectrum and I just genuinely love music. Me and a pair of Newtons with my ipod is about the equivalent of someone handing me a winning lottery ticket.


    Winning Cowtown 50k 2014 NRE Debut

    I just finished my biggest goal for the year. It was a double ultra, two weekends back to back. I did the Nove Colli 125-mile race in Italy in the mountains. And then, 5 days later there was a 100K road race in Italy. I found out later that I’m the only female who has done the double. They keep records for how fast all the guys have gone and the times I ran it places me in 4th place overall ever.

    I haven’t chosen a race for fall yet. I am looking for a PR. I would like to break 16 hours.

  • Keeping up with Sugarland guitarist, Thad Beaty

    When a health crisis hit his family, Newton Ambassador Thad Beaty, began to move his musical life toward new ways that mattered.


    Thad Beaty loves music. Always has. When the guitar player for the country band Sugarland, is not on the road, he’s in Nashville working at his day job, Sorted Noise, producing songs for movies. But in 2009, a curveball was thrown at him, when his mom was diagnosed with colon cancer. Since then, his daily routine has involved a lot more than music.

    At the time of the diagnosis, the 5’10” Beatty was 34 years old and weighed 230 pounds. He says, “We went into panic mode. My brother, my wife and I and my mom all decided as a family that we could do better at being healthy. So, we immediately started researching the best diet for dealing with cancer,” he says. What happened next, was something he never would have expected.

    Thad Beaty, guitarist for country Grammy band Sugarland

    “We learned that a raw diet, greatly lowers your cancer risk levels. But we thought, ‘good grief, there’s no way we can do that.’” Yet, he and his wife bought a Vitamix blender and started having smoothies for breakfast and salads for lunch. And suddenly, they were 66 percent raw already.

    “Before I knew it, I was fully vegetarian a few months out and the only thing left before I went Vegan was Greek yogurt—that was the last stronghold.”

    At the same time that his food transformation was taking place, Beaty started exercising.  While on the road with the band, he started to run. “I could take off running in the middle of nowhere.” When he came home there was a pool in his neighborhood, so he started swimming. Next, he pulled out his old mountain bike. “I was doing a little of each and a little more and then something just triggered along the way.”

    Before he knew it, Beaty was Vegan, and his training turned to competing in triathlons—not just sprint triathlons, but Ironman triathlons, with his first in Arizona in 2012, then Kona in 2013. His 230 pounds quickly melted away to a stealth 160 pounds. In a relatively short period of time, his very Southern family had completely transformed itself, including his mom, who is now gluten free and vegan.

    Along the way, Beaty started reading Newton co-founder, Danny Abshire’s book, Natural Running: The Simple Path to Stronger, Healthier Running. “I started working on all the drills. Then I bought Newtons and hit the road. I was amazed at how my body felt and my times were way faster. I was hooked.”

    As Beaty started down the Ironman path, he started to consider the powerful correlation between sport, the music industry and giving back. First, he struck up a relationship with the Ironman organization. Then, he began to look for companies who shared his belief system of giving back.  A training partner and Newton athlete, Shay Eskew, shared with him the non-profit work that Newton was doing. “Once I realized our core values aligned well, I had to reach out.” A partnership was struck, and now he says, “We have done some amazing things together and I think we will do a ton more.”

    Around this time, Beaty founded Musicthatmoves.org to encourage the music industry to give back in ways that are healthy for the community. His motivation was spurred by the fact that in addition to his mom’s illness, the band’s guitar tech, Kevin Quigley, was diagnosed with Lymphoma and lost his battle against the disease less than a year later.

    “Health is holistic. It is mind, body and spirit. If you don’t have a good balance of those three, then you are out of whack. I saw how harmonious endurance events and getting involved in social movements were together.”

    Now, Beaty and a team of about 20 people from the music industry are training for the Ragnar Relay from Chattanooga to Nashville in October to “reclaim their health”.  Of his teammates, Beaty says, “They didn’t all come from an athletic background and they want to make a change. So we’re going on this journey together.” Each member is doing the relay to raise money for a cause or non-profit of their choice. “What resonated so strongly with them is that endurance events become a beautiful vehicle to affect change. If you do it for a cause, it becomes super special.”

    Beaty and fellow Newton Runner, Bo Parrish, have also teamed up to form New Life for Newton, connecting gently used Newton shoes with cross-country and track coaches and inner city kids who are in need of shoes. They have enjoyed delivering the shoes themselves to these young running teams and spending an afternoon or day training with them. The list of initiatives Beaty has taken on is long and this is in addition to work and still training hard. Ironman Chattanooga in September is on his hit list for this year. But now with several races under his belt, he says, “It’s not about the finish line, it’s about everything you learn getting to the finish line and then that’s a place to celebrate everything you’ve learned and to carry those lessons forward.” For now, he’s celebrating the fact that his mom’s cancer is in remission.


    You can watch Thad Beaty on ABC this Tuesday, July 15, on “Extreme Makeover Weight Loss.” In the episode he worked with a woman who went from the couch to doing a 70.3 triathlon. Beaty says, “We had her rocking some Newtons.”

  • It’s good to be 7

    The Truth About Newton Running

    Like a carefree first-grader effortlessly bounding across the playground, Newton Running celebrated its 7th birthday in late March at the IRONMAN triathlon in Oceanside, California. My co-founder Jerry Lee and I began living a dream the day we started Newton Running. A dream founded with a revolutionary idea, a small assortment of demo shoes and a resolve to change not only the world of running, but through giving back, perhaps even change the world.


    As I reflect on the past seven years, and Newton’s growing place in the running market, I have never been more proud of the direction of our company or inspired by the uplifting daily reminders of the positive impact we've had on runners around the globe. Perhaps most gratifying is Newton’s unwavering commitment to a consistent set of innovative beliefs that have guided the company from its earliest days and led so many runners to find a home with the Newton tribe.

    At Newton, we believe in:

    Helping You Run Better:

    • There's a "Right" way to run. This doesn't mean all runners run alike or that you must run a certain way to enjoy running or the unique benefits of Newton running shoes. Simply that the best-practice fundamentals of posture, position and cadence apply to us all. And when followed, they lead to healthier more efficient running. 


    • Every runner can run better. Did you know that running form drills are a standard part of the training regimens for most of the elite athletes who work with Newton? We learn to swim, to ride a bike, to follow a disciplined training plan. A small focus on the fundamentals of running can yield enormous benefits for us all.


    • No other running shoe helps improve your running like a Newton. Our lightweight, level platform and patented Action/Reaction technology supports better, more efficient running through maximized ground-to-foot energy transmission. There's nothing else like it.


    The lasting power of personal relationships:

    • Virtually every Saturday, I lead a group run form clinic out of the Newton Running Lab in Boulder, Colorado. This opportunity to connect with fellow runners as they experience the Newton difference and discover the feel of efficient running is always one of the most rewarding parts of my week. 


    • If you attend a major marathon or IRONMAN expo, chances are good that Jerry Lee or I will be there, usually on our hands and knees fitting customers in shoes. We live for our running community. Personally engaging with new and seasoned runners alike who share our passion is and always will be core to our success.


    • Our customer service team is on a first-name basis with an impressive list of Newton runners, many of whom have been loyal Newtonites since our 2007 launch and proudly display a closet full of colorful Newtons from virtually every launch. We are so grateful for their loyalty.


    In giving back:

    • We founded Newton with the goal of establishing a double bottom line. Profitability supporting the committed team that makes Newton run, while also sharing in our success with those less fortunate, or in crisis. To date Newton has given more than $1.5 million to charitable causes. 


    • From trail clean-ups, to food drives to evenings serving meals to those in need, giving back together bonds our team in unbreakable ways.

    It's good to be Seven. Thanks to all of you who have joined us for the ride and here's to along run into the future.

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