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Just say “Yes”: Winter’s World Marathon Tour for prostate cancer

Posted by on Friday, July 19, 2013 @ 9:14 am | Leave a reply

Very few can truly say they grew up in Newtons. In 2007, the year that Newton Running Company launched, my foot was too small for them. I was just 8 years old and already a seasoned runner, competing in 5K’s and 10K’s. My foot swam inside a size 5. I was left to stare in envy at my mom’s pink Newtons.

I remember my mom coming home from the 2007 Ironman World Championships, where she volunteered in the medical tent as a physician. She had a shiny, new pair of pink running shoes. Little did my mom know that when she bought one of the very first pair of Newtons, she would be supporting research of the cancer that would steal her husband and take my dad. A portion of the proceeds from that shoe benefited prostate cancer, a cancer unfortunately all too well known to the co-founder of Newton Running, Jerry Lee.

Jerry and Winter

In 2008, I attended Ironman Lake Placid — my first Ironman! I was just 9 years old, overlooking the Olympic Oval full of bikes. I crossed the finish line with my idol, my mom (when kids were still allowed to cross the line with parents). I was dressed just like her, pink Newtons and all. I knew then, Ironman Lake Placid would be on my bucket list! It was there that I remember meeting a man who slipped that first pink pair of size 5 Newtons on my feet. Newtons have never left my feet since. I now call Jerry Lee and his company “family” and I race for him as well as my dad and the 1 in 6 men affected by prostate cancer around the world.

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The following year, 2009, would redefine my life. I would now have to live without my dad physically by my side. I made a vow with my brothers, that we would chase prostate cancer to the end of the world and stomp it out like it stomped our dad out! It was the birth of Team Winter. I had completed an Olympic Distance Triathlon just months before my dad’s passing. It was the last race he would hug me at the finish line. It was a race many said I couldn’t finish and that I was too young. Little did the critics know, that was just the beginning for me.

Memorial

Now, at age 14, I have four marathons, on four continents, under my race belt. It hasn’t been easy though. The journey to the start line of these marathons is the real story. Running the marathons has become the easy part! “You’re too young,” “You can’t run our marathon, but you can run our 5K,” “Wait until you get older,” “You must be 18 years old,” “NO!” Over and over, these are the responses that I got when I set out to become the youngest person to run a marathon on all seven continents.

It is all part of my dream that I began planning at 10 years of age, a World Marathon Tour for Prostate Cancer Awareness. I wanted to achieve this world record in memory of my dad and the men and their families affected by prostate cancer. I guess it’s a good thing my mom taught me “Never take ‘No’ for an answer,” never accept, “You can’t,” “You won’t”, “You shouldn’t”. If I had let these thoughts enter my mind, my marathon tour probably would not have got very far. I honestly can’t even tell you how many “No’s” my mom and I got from race directors around the world. I lost count, but never lost faith and hope.

Eugene Marathon, in April 2012, would kick off my World Marathon Tour. The Newton trainer has always been my favorite distance running shoe. This shoe would help me run my first marathon at age 13 in 3:45:04, just 5 minutes shy of a Boston Marathon qualifying time. Next stop was Kenya, the Amazing Maasai. It was my first trail marathon and despite a strong field of Kenyans, I placed 3rd overall female. I took over 20 pairs of my old Newton running shoes that I had worn over the years and donated them to the young Kenyan runners, many of whom ran in sandals made from tires. It was incredible to run against the Kenyans who have become some of the fastest runners in the world.

Winter Running

 

Winter in Africa

My next two marathons would challenge even the seasoned runners. After consulting Newton, we decided to bring out the retired Newton all-weather trainer. This proved extremely beneficial as I headed to the “End of the World”. My 3rd marathon would take place on the rugged, frozen tundra of Antarctica. What could possibly top that marathon? Well, the cancellation of my original South America marathon, Galapagos, had me now facing the “toughest marathon in the world”, Peru’s Inca Trail Marathon.

Winter in Antartica

How does anyone even train for such a race on the Inca Trail at nearly 14,000 feet? My run coach, Mark Hadley, was not even fazed by the change in races. He quickly put together a running plan filled with hill runs and more hill runs. Never once did he doubt or question my ability to tackle such an extreme marathon.

As an Olympic hopeful for the 2018 Winter Olympics in aerial skiing, I fortunately live in Park City, Utah, where I’m consistently training and running at 7,000 plus feet of elevation. I did as my run coach said and faithfully put in all the long runs. Not to forget, recovering with ice baths and foam rolling! I threw in a lot of cross training with swimming, mountain biking, aerial ski training and lots of weight training to maintain a really strong core. I had just come back from setting a world record for the youngest person to run 26.2 miles in Antarctica in March. How tough could the Inca Trail be?

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Check back here next week to find out!

 

Join Team Winter or make a Donation!

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Andrea’s Final Countdown

Posted by on Friday, October 5, 2012 @ 9:36 am | Leave a reply

Time flies much faster than I can run, and now my half marathon is, as I write this, a mere 6 days away! This is the first time I’ve really put a lot of effort into preparing for a race. I’ve always trained (and by training, I mean running a few times a week with no prescribed schedule) and each time I’ve managed to pull off a respectable, middle of the pack finishing time. But it was always a huge struggle to finish each race, and I always ran the last quarter feeling depleted and too exhausted to enjoy the finish. But this race is different. I want this race to be BETTER! As I’ve mentioned before, I’m really not expecting a PR in this race, but I am expecting to run a BETTER race. I expect to run mindfully, maintaining good form. I expect to run a negative split, paying attention to my pace and how my body feels.  Although a half marathon is difficult, I expect to finish without a struggle, and with enough energy to enjoy the race, and savor my finish (not to mention my post-race brunch!)

I’ve already talked about how I’ve been training for this race with a combination of speed work and distance runs. I am confident that my endurance has increased dramatically since I began incorporating speed work into my regime. If I’m able to pace myself well during the first half of the race, I will be able to draw on this power of endurance to run the last half strong, and pour on the speed in the last few kilometers.

Now that the race is less than a week away, my entire regime has changed dramatically. All the training guides and forums I’ve read agree on one thing: what you do the week before a race will have almost as significant an impact as what you do in the weeks and months of training. With this idea in mind, I put a lot of thought into how to spend my last week in order to make this race better than any that came before.

THE TAPER:  I started tapering last week. My longest distance run, 18 km, was last Monday. It felt good, and I wanted to do another one this weekend, but I resisted the temptation and spent a day with my much neglected road bike instead. I ran my speed workout in a lower pace group. It was still challenging, but it didn’t reduce me to my usual quivering, sweat soaked state of collapse. Yesterday’s work out was an intense (VERY intense) session of hill repeats that left me feeling limp, but confident. That was my last hard session, and I went full out, but kept it short. I plan to fit in a relatively short tempo session on Wednesday or Thursday, mainly to maintain a good sense of pace, and to keep myself sharp.  Friday will be a rest day, with, at most, a brisk walk at lunch to keep the blood moving, and Saturday evening will include a 2-3 km easy run to keep my muscles warm, loosen everything up, and calm my nerves. Many training programs advise a longer period of tapering, especially when training for a full marathon. Unfortunately, because my training season was cut short, I simply didn’t have time for a longer taper. My main concern and objective is simply to be warm and limber, but also well rested and ready to run hard.

Andrea's Hill

EATING (and eating and eating):  I’ve read a LOT of conflicting information on carbo loading leading up to a race or long run, and everyone seems to have a differing opinion. Some advise not to bother carbo loading at all. Some say you should eat as per usual for the last week, and only carbo load the day before the race. Others recommend increasing carb intake by a significant amount for the entire week leading up to the race. Not being an athletic trainer or a nutritionist, I’m really not qualified to venture an opinion this subject.  As with most aspects of my training, I’ve done what feels best for me. For the most part, I tend to follow a relatively low calorie, balanced diet. Most of my meals are pretty light, and I tend to eat frequently. This week, I’ve continued to eat frequently, but increased the amount I intake during each meal. I’m still taking in plenty of protein and veg, but I’m eating a lot more carbs than is normal for me. I’m not eating more than I feel is healthy, or more than is comfortable. My aim is to feel full and satisfied, and give myself enough energy to fall back on during my run. I’ll also admit that I love to eat, and carbo loading is a great excuse to do so with relative abandon. Favorite meals include whole grain bagels with cream cheese, yogurt with berries, honey and oats, kamut pasta with tomato sauce, and open face beef fajitas with low fat refried beans. I’m going to enjoy it all while I can!

Sleep: As much as possible. That’s all I have to say about that.

The Mental Side: For me, running is at least 50% mental. I like to prepare myself mentally for a long run at least a day ahead. I decide ahead of time that I’m going to run a certain distance, visualize the route, how I’m going to feel at certain stages, and how i will overcome any challenges such as fatigue, boredom or bad weather. If I have any doubts in my mind when I start out, they seem to magnify as I go along, and can actually derail my run. It’s crucial for my performance that I BELIEVE my run is going to go well, and I really have to focus on maintaining this belief leading up to the run. I’ve spent this week focusing on building and maintaining confidence in my endurance, and an optimistic and positive outlook, which can be challenging when you’re tired, sore, crabby and anxious. I visualize the excitement of lining up in the corral with hundreds of other runners, that amazing moment when I find my pace, slip into my stride, and become one with the pavement. Most of all, I visualize that magic moment when I cross the finish line, beat up and exhausted, but in possession of a personal triumph that no one can ever take away from me. Oh, and of course I visualize the delicious, ridiculously oversized brunch that I insist will be waiting for me after my triumphant finish!

When my energy really starts to flag during a long distance, I find it extremely helpful to have a mantra to repeat over and over. Just a few positive words that I need to remind myself of, and that I can focus on to the exclusion of everything else. For this race, I’m going to go with “I’m ready, I’m strong, I can, I will”. Cheesy? Perhaps. Effective? For me, most definitely.

Everything else: Logistically, there are a thousand tiny details that go into preparing for a run in another city. What to pack, what to wear on race day, transportation, picking up the race package, what to eat before the race, where to meet friends and family after the finish line, and NOT forgetting your running shoes (as I managed to do for my first half marathon). My philosophy regarding logistics is simple. Prepare as much as you can as far ahead as possible. Then stop worrying, because the rest will fall into place eventually. And so far, it always has!

In the end, only time will tell if all of this preparation will prove to be beneficial. My methods are far from scientific. Some of it may help, some may have little to no impact. However, despite the fact that I anticipate a slower finishing time than my last half marathon, I know deep down that this race will be better, because I’ve done what I need to do to achieve the goal I set for this race; to run a strong half marathon, and enjoy every second of the experience.

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Change of Pace

Posted by on Friday, July 22, 2011 @ 2:30 pm | Leave a reply

Stephen Gartside, COO Newton Running

32 years of running marathons, I thought it was time for a change of pace and living in Colorado I turned to the trails and discovered I like ultra running.  This past weekend I did the North Fork 50, only my 6th ultra, but with a plan in mind.  That plan is to try the Leadville 100 once in my life.  This is the year and the training has been both challenging and fun.  I miss the roads a little bit, but the adventures on the trail have been great.  My strategy has been simply more miles, slower pace, lots of trails and some high elevation training.  I run a lot early in the morning before work, so a lot of my runs have by on trails lit only by my head lamp and the moon.  Living and training in the mountain above 8,000ft I have come across raccoons, deer, elk, coyotes, foxes and even one mountain lion.  I have run a lot of miles solo, but enjoy when I can get friends to head out early with me.

Just a few more big training weeks and it’s time to start a little taper.  On race day, I have a few of my best running buddies including my wife pacing me for the last 50 miles.  It’s a 4am start four Saturdays from now, and I hope to finish before the sun rises that next Sunday morning.

We all love running at Newton and put the shoes to the test ourselves.  I can say I have gone through a few more pairs of Newton Running shoes this year putting in the 100 mile weeks.

Happy trails.

 

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Weekend Race Report: rev3, Sedona Marathon

Posted by on Wednesday, February 23, 2011 @ 11:34 am | Leave a reply

FOTOS NEWTON 15B

The Newton Triathlon Team Costa Rica swept the standings at the Revolution 3 Half Ironman Triathlon in Costa Rica over the weekend. Placing second through fifth was Pablo Montoya, Dominique Cocusse, Galiano Luconi  and Milton Esquivel.

In the Olympic Distance event, French pro triathlete  Romain Guillaume placed sixth in the Pro division. View full results here.

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Also last weekend, Laura Kelly won her age group (eighth overall) at Arizona’s Sedona Marathon. “I signed up at the last minute despite having having tired legs from doing a mountain bike race and trail race the previous weekend,” says Kelly. “I was nervous about all the pavement and 1000 feet of ascent but ended up having a great run. I love my Newtons!”

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Team Newton Cleans Up at Colfax Marathon

Posted by on Monday, May 17, 2010 @ 8:59 am | Leave a reply

Newton Running had two relay teams in the Colorado Colfax Marathon Sunday May 16.  Newton Running won the Corporate Division of this mile high race finishing 3rd overall out of 470 relay teams in a time of 2:48:05.  The Newton Running Lab Team finished just a few minutes back.  Newton Running team members (pictured) included Ian Adamson, Hawk Wathen, James Batty, Jacob Edwards and Stephen Gartside.  The Newton Running Lab team included Jennifer Abshire, Danny Abshire, Jerry Lee, Paul South and Brian Metzler.  Good fun on a sunny Sunday morning in Denver.
ColfaxNewtonTeam
Newton Running entered two relay teams to race in the Colorado Colfax Marathon yesterday.  Team Newton Running won the Corporate Division of this mile high race, finishing third overall out of 470 relay teams in a time of 2:48:05. The Newton Running Lab Team finished just a few minutes back. Newton Running team members (pictured) included Ian Adamson, Hawk Wathen, James Batty, Jacob Edwards and Stephen Gartside. The Newton Running Lab team included Jennifer Abshire, Danny Abshire, Jerry Lee, Paul South and Brian Metzler. With sunny skies and cool temperatures making for excellent race conditions, almost 6,000 runners turned out for the fifth installment of the Colfax event — 600 in the marathon, 3,058 in the half marathon and 2,220 in the marathon relay. Good fun on a Sunday morning in Denver – congrats to both Newton teams!
ColfaxIan
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Congrats to Dr. Mark (and all the Boston finishers!)

Posted by on Monday, April 19, 2010 @ 2:15 pm | 2 Replies

This weekend Dr. Mark Cucuzzella (1110) led a panel on running form in front of a packed house at the Boston Marathon Expo. This morning Mark ran a 2:34:21 at the Marathon placing him among the top Masters finishers, and making it the fourth decade in which he has run a sub-2:35 race. That’s what I call walking (running) the talk.

Congrats to all the Boston finishers! It was a great race with a new record time for the men and a thrilling finish for the women!

Boston 001

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Running Boston? Read This How-To Guide

Posted by on Wednesday, April 14, 2010 @ 8:45 am | 1 Reply

boston-marathon-logoFirst of all, for those of you running in the 114th Boston Marathon next Monday, congratulations on qualifying! There are enough pre-race guides and preparation materials out there that I get butterflies in my stomach just skimming them, but we’ve got one more terrific resource you should really check out before Monday. If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you’ve heard us talk about Dr. Mark Cucuzzella before. He’s an Associate Professor of Family Medicine at West Virginia University and an expert in exercise physiology and running biomechanics (to be clear, he is not on the Newton Running payroll). He has run over 50 marathons and competed at Boston 16 times, finishing 5 times under 2:30.

AF Marathon09The good doctor just sent us a detailed and thoughtful document entitled “How to Run the Boston Marathon.” Whether you’re running Boston on Monday, a marathon later this year, or even just a local 5K sometime soon, Dr. Mark’s guide is a very insightful tool you shouldn’t miss. Click the following link to download the pdf guide and by all means, pass this along to anyone you know racing on Monday: How to Run the Boston Marathon.

The team from Newton is on it’s way to Boston right now. If you’re in the area, please come by and say hello at the race expo. It’s free and open to the public. Also, don’t miss Dr. Mark, Dr. Dan Lieberman, Warren Green and Amby Burfoot from Runner’s World leading a seminar called “Shoes, Barefoot, Pose, Chi: How Should You Run?” on Saturday at 3pm presented by Runner’s World. Details here.

Otherwise, good luck to everyone at Boston. We’ll be cheering you on!

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Find Newton Running at Expos on Both Coasts this Weekend

Posted by on Thursday, March 18, 2010 @ 9:24 pm | 1 Reply

GravityW_10smIt’s a busy weekend for the crew at Newton Running with events and expos on both the left and right coasts. First up, is the expo at the LA Marathon on Friday and Saturday at Dodger Stadium – please come say hello to our team (Steve, Yo, Erin and Erica) at the brand new Newton booth. On the other side of the country, we’re teaming up with All3Sports.com to host a booth at the ING Georgia Marathon expo at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta. Timmy and Tory will be in Atlanta to answer all your Newton needs.

The expos in LA and Atlanta will be the first opportunity see (and/or purchase) our new Performance Trainers. In fact, if you come by our booth and try on a pair of new shoes, and say the code words “level platform,” we’ll give you a free gift (while they last).

Finally Danny, Ian and Dr. Mark are hosting our second Natural Running Symposium on Friday and Saturday in Boston, where we’ll also have our new shoes to try on.

We hope to see you out this weekend!

 

Our brand new expo booth will be at the LA Marathon

Our brand new expo booth will be at the LA Marathon

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Weekend Race Recap – IM China and Catalina Marathon

Posted by on Monday, March 15, 2010 @ 9:49 am | 2 Replies

Last year at Ironman China, Hungarian triathlete and Newton pro team member, Jozsef Major, struggled through the race on a borrowed bike after his was lost in transit. This past weekend at the race in Haikou, China, Major was bent on redemption. Australian Luke McKenzie won the race and set a new course record, but Major combined the fastest bike split of the day with the second fastest run, to finish second overall. Congrats Jozsef! What a great start to the season!  Read a full recap here.

Also this weekend, Newton’s very own Heather Fuhr (Ironman World Champion and a five-time Ironman USA winner), demonstrated her running prowess at the 33rd annual Catalina Marathon. Heather completed the 26-miles trail race in three hours and seven minutes, breaking the previous record of 3:15:20 set by Danelle Ballangee in 1997. Impressively, Fuhr placed third overall in this beautiful but tough trail marathon. Nice job Heather! More here.

Tell us about your weekend of racing in the comments section below and we’ll send our favorite entry a free Newton hat and socks!

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ING NYC Marathon Expo & Natural Running Clinic

Posted by on Tuesday, October 27, 2009 @ 8:11 am | 1 Reply

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The New York City Marathon is less than five days away and Newton Running’s venerable expo team is ‘wheels up’ on their way to the Big Apple. If you’re racing in New York, or live near the city, we’d love to see you. Here are a few places to catch up with the Newton crew.

Marathon Expo – Jacob Javits Convention Center, 11th Avenue at 35th Street, Manhattan.
Thurs. & Fri. 10 am.-8 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
All entrants in the marathon have to pick up their race packets here, but the expo is open to the public! Come by the Newton booth to meet Newton’s founders Jerry Lee and Danny Abshire, Newton pro Josh Cox, demo a pair of new shoes or buy some Newton merchandise. We’re selling all our shoes at the booth and to celebrate Breast Cancer Awareness Month, when you buy a pair of Pink Distance Racers for $155, you’ll get a free pink hat and tech t-shirt and we’ll donate $50 from the purchase to support breast cancer research.

There’s a whole list of cool stuff going on at the expo, everything from an appearance by actor Anthony Edwards, to a contest to win $10K in gasoline (ed note: that’s a weird prize to offer a bunch of runners). See the full list of expo activities here.

Friday morning Natural Running Form Clinic/Fun Run with Danny Abshire and IronBrandon
On Friday morning, the Newton crew is getting up bright and early for a run in the park. With the help of IronBrandon (a.k.a. Brandon Wood) we’re organizing a FREE Natural Running clinic and fun run lead by running form guru Danny Abshire. Danny will present the basics of natural running, lead the group through a few drills and then Brandon is going to lead us on a run through the park. It should be a lot of fun and we’re hoping to make a big statement with a large turnout. As an added incentive, we’ll give everyone who shows up a free Newton race hat or visor. Please come out and join us. We’re meeting at the Boathouse in Central Park on Friday, Oct. 30 at 7 a.m.

Saturday International Fun Run
If you’re looking for a final tune-up for Sunday, or you want to join a bunch of international runners for a spin through the Park, then consider this Saturday morning 4k run. Some of the Newton crew will be out representing.

Sunday – Race Day!
Race Day. The Newton team will be out cheering! The pro women start at 9:10 a.m.. If you’re not in the city, you can watch from home on TV or the web. Listings here.

Hope to see you in the Big Apple and good luck to everyone racing!

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