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Meet The Dogs Of Newton – Week 9 Ella

Posted by on Monday, July 15, 2013 @ 9:02 am | Leave a reply

Meet The Dogs of Newton - Ella week 9My name is Ella. I’m from the streets of Phoenix, where I spent my puppy-hood homeless, begging on the corner with a cardboard sign. My life has greatly improved since being hired by Newton Running where I  work at the Lab in Boulder. Selling running shoes is a challenge due to my phobia of people and because I have paws.

My Father says I’m a Stink Hound, but I believe I’m an exotic Pharoah Hound of noble blood line.

My hobbies include hunting small, cute creatures such as rabbits, squirrels, and prairie dogs and sleeping. In summer I love going on high mountain runs where I play on glaciers and swim in lakes. In moments of great joy, I am compelled to run figure-eights.

I’m not fond of puppies, babies, or dry dog food and believe that cats are not to be trusted.

Thanks for reading a little about me and may you enjoy your summer!

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From the Expert: Dr. Mark Cucuzzella’s Simple Food Rules for Runners

Posted by on Tuesday, April 30, 2013 @ 11:25 am | Leave a reply

This article originally appeared on Dr. Mark’s, Natural Running Center

My wife’s grandmother lived to 103, and the holidays just past have reminded me of how she lived. She was not a runner, nor did she do a lot of cardio, except for sauce stirring and daily walks to markets and church. Our own local legend Frank Buckles who lived to 110 ate in this manner too; he was a farmer.

Walking and running are good for you, but without proper nutrition one will not achieve optimal health.

On  this topic, I encourage you to read Dr. Phil Maffetone’s most recent Natural Running Center’s article that examines the negative impact of sugar consumption (even from refined-flour food favorites such as bagels) and the runner.  As he points out, “Unfortunately, too many of these calories burned during a workout are in the form of sugar and not fat. This occurs because the consumption of sugar affects one’s metabolism, forcing the body to use much more glucose for energy and too little fat. The result is less energy available for working out and virtually all other activities, and, because less fat is used for energy, it’s stored throughout the body.”

Best-selling food author Michael Pollan has written extensively on the topic of sound, life-extending nutrition. He states, “Cultures eating wide variety of traditional diets do not get Western diseases.” How true.

And many of us have committed to memory his simple recommendation: “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants”

In his book, “Food Rules,” he identified “64 Health and Nutrition Facts. The Unfortunate Truths” Here’s 10 of them from his useful list:

2. Don’t eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.
17. Eat only foods that have been cooked by humans.
18. Don’t ingest foods made in places where everyone is required to wear a surgical cap.
19. If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don’t.
20. It’s not food if it arrived through the window of your car
21. It’s not food if it’s called by the same name in every language (Think Big Mac, Cheetos or Pringles)
37. The whiter the bread, the sooner you’ll be dead,
57. Don’t get your fuel from the same place your car does.
58. Do all your eating at a table
64. Break the rules once in a while!

Here’s some other helpful  resources that will help keep you on the road to healthy eating:

Details on sugary drinks: http://fewersugarydrinks.org/

Recipes for Health, NY Times: http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/health/series/recipes_for_health/index.html

The ultimate source for what’s in foods (go here if you dare): http://www.calorieking.com/foods

The Skinny on Obesity. A must view for every human: http://www.uctv.tv/skinny-on-obesity/

Weight of the Nation on HBO- 4 hours of documentary free online: http://theweightofthenation.hbo.com/

Dr. Dan Lieberman: http://nytimes.com/2012/06/06/opinion/evolutions-sweet-tooth.html

Books: In Defense of Food and Food Rules by Michael Pollan; Why We Get Fat and What to do About It and Good Calories , Bad Calories by Gary Taubs

Movies: Forks over Knives; Food Inc; Super Size Me; Sick, Fat, and Nearly Dead

 

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Social Media Round-Up: 4.26.13

Posted by on Friday, April 26, 2013 @ 3:38 pm | Leave a reply

In this week’s social media round-up, we’re going to make sure you guys know how to find Newton Running on the interwebs so we can see all the great pictures, posts, pins, tweets and videos you guys are creating!

First up is the Newton Running Facebook page! If you’re not already a “fan” of Newton Running then you should be. Our page is a place where Newton Runners share their stories, whether they’re stories of their daily run mileage, a weekend race or a story of running completely changing their lives. We’re not just watching you guys talk on Facebook, we’re part of the conversation and love to hear what you guys say and see how we can help! Click the Facebook button below to visit our page and become part of the conversation!

Newton Running on Facebook

Next up is Twitter. Just like Facebook, we want to be a part of the conversation and talk to you guys! If you have a question, ask it! If you have a picture, share it! If you have something not so nice to say, feel free (though we reserve the right to have our feeling hurt). Click the Twitter button below to follow us.

Newton Running on Twitter

Pinterest is amazing. We haven’t been on Pinterest that long but with it’s image and information driven platform it fits right in with our colorful shoes and our perhaps even more colorful audience! Whether it’s a cool article or picture about running form or if it’s a re-pin of something that one of you have posted, we aim to make our Pinterest page a thing of beauty! Click below to follow us!

And now for the awesome Instagram. We first arrived on Instagram in mid-2011. We’d post a picture here and there but not too much. Earlier this year (2013) we started doing a little digging and realized that, thanks to our fans, we were ALL OVER i Instagram! Seriously, just search the tag: #newtonrunning and you’ll come across thousands of pictures of you guys, out there on the roads and trails, racking up the miles in Newton Running shoes. Check out our feed below and get involved!



 

That’s all we’re going to list for now but trust us, we’re out there on more social media platforms (Google+, Foursquare, Tumblr) and bringing the Newton love to and from all of you. If you can find us, follow us. if you think we need to be somewhere that we’re not, let us know and we’ll get on it!

For now, let us know your social media URL’s in the comments and we’ll give you a follow!

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Thad Beatty for Kona Inspired

Posted by on Wednesday, April 24, 2013 @ 2:57 pm | Leave a reply

Thad Beatty, guitarist for country stars Sugarland, wants to inspire an to be inspired. Over the past couple of years, Thad has gone from a musician on the road who was 75 lbs. overweight, eating poorly and simply unhealthy. Then he decided to make a change.

In the last year, apart from becoming an Ironman, Thad has become a part of the Newton family. He’s also a member of the Ironman Foundation – Newton Running Ambassador Triathlon Team as well as an ambassador for Ironman’s Kona Inspired.

The Kona Inspired program provides seven slots for the Ironman World Championship driven by aspirational stories and voted on by the triathlon community. The program returns this year as a global opportunity with the support of the Ironman Foundation.

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Newton Running Social Media Round-Up: 4.5.13

Posted by on Monday, April 8, 2013 @ 1:33 pm | Leave a reply

This week began with April Fool’s day and Newton took the opportunity to announce a new shoe line coming out this summer!

April Fools'!

 

Later in the week we took to our own Instagram to hint at our “Boston Cheers!” contest that is now live! if you’d like to take part and maybe win some shoes, click the picture below to enter!

Boston-Cheers-Entry-PageOn Facebook, we had several people ask how much life they had on their shoes. We LOVE to give you guys feedback on this so please never hesitate to ask!

Here a pic of the soles 350 miles in. Are they holding up ok or no?

Here a pic of the soles 350 miles in. Are they holding up ok or no?

Can I get some feedback on shoe wear?

Can I get some feedback on shoe wear?

As usual, Instagram was blowing up with some fantastic Newton Running pictures bringing the total number of pictures tagged with #newtonrunning to almost 3000!! We have to thank you guys so much for making us such a part of your daily workouts. You keep taking them and we’ll keep talking about them!

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Got more for us to share? Let us know by following us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or Pinterest!

 

 

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Newton Running Social Media Round-up: 3.22.13

Posted by on Friday, March 22, 2013 @ 2:15 pm | Leave a reply

We’re dedicating this week’s social media round-up to Instagram! There are so many Newton runners who share their love of our shoes through pictures (our shoes do tend to be rather photogenic!) and we’d like to give you, dear reader, a sampling of what we’ve seen in the past few days.

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Screen Shot 2013-03-22 at 2.25.26 PMCLICK HERE TO FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM!

 

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From the Expert: Dr. Mark Cucuzzella On Single Focus Running Studies

Posted by on Thursday, February 14, 2013 @ 7:55 am | Leave a reply

recent study of less than 40 East African tribesman showed that most  land on their heels while running at a slow pace on a compliant surface (not pavement) and when they sped up most changed their pattern to midfoot landing.  Some in the media then grabbed onto this small sample and somehow arrived at the following “conclusions”:

•    Barefoot running is not a good thing…the fad is over
•    This supports cushioned running shoes with elevated heels

The study looked at the Daasanach who are a pastoral tribe living in a remote section of northern Kenya. According to the New York Times, “Unlike some Kenyan tribes, the Daasanach have no tradition of competitive distance running, although they are physically active. They also have no tradition of wearing shoes.”The study looked at the Daasanach who are a pastoral tribe living in a remote section of northern Kenya. According to the New York Times, “Unlike some Kenyan tribes, the Daasanach have no tradition of competitive distance running, although they are physically active. They also have no tradition of wearing shoes.”

 

Let’s see now, the African subjects were running barefoot; but people land in different ways, and as you speed up you get more forward on your foot. Not surprising as anyone who runs, coaches, researches, or even observes runners knows .  There was absolutely no reference or relevance to injuries or footwear effects in this study. These happy tribesman were jogging slowly in their bare feet as they do daily, and I doubt any of them had or ever will have running injuries.

They were active tribal people (not habitual runners) running at a jogging pace.

This study reinforces what many of us in the Running Medicine field have been voicing for a long time. People are focusing on one variable and most often it is footwear or what part of your foot hits the ground first,  and ignoring the other 90% of the equation.

Runners get hurt by running.  Most often by running  too much, too fast, and often with poor strength and movement mechanics. Humans are also highly variable and it is doubtful any of us does or should land in the same way every time, on every surface , and at every speed.

No one of credibility in the professional field is telling runners to land on their forefoot or ball of foot in isolation, nor suggesting  for folks to chuck their shoes.  What is interesting in studies is they rarely agree on what a forefoot or midfoot strike actually is.  A true forefoot strike is probably along the base of the 5th metatarsal (outside edge of foot), not the ball of the foot or metatarsal heads.

As an often barefoot runner I land different on different surfaces at different speeds. On soft golf courses and easy pace, I roll nicely from the heel.  Running fast on concrete, I need to engage the foot more as shock absorber and to prestretch the takeoff muscle contraction.

Remember the key is running elastic– landing close to your center of mass, and engaging the posterior muscles (glutes).

I still stand behind what we filmed here as the Principles of Natural Running. Not where do we say that runners should aim to land on the ball of the foot.

Running barefoot in itself will not change most of the other variables contributing to poor form and injury, but it does have a role in the relearning process.

See our Stability and Mobility section on the Natural Running Center, and notice where the real improvements occur and do lots of progressive drills to rewire the movement pattern.

Another finding reinforcing what we know is that as the runners ran faster, they landed on their forefoot more often. This is normal and necessary.

Everyone’s form changes when they go from 9:00 per mile to 5:00 per mile. As one moves faster it is efficient to eccentrically stretch the triceps surae the load the Achilles spring. This is like jumping: .load, trigger, fire.

Instructing an 9:00 mile runner  to  emulate the 5:00 mile biomechanics is short sighted and one should not suggest it.

My personal take-home messages from this recent study of African tribesman and the “barefoot” attention that resulted from it is as follows:

•    Do not focus on footstrike in isolation
•    Gradually increase cadence
•    Mix it up….surfaces, shoes, barefoot,
•    Use your glutes and extend the hips from a stable core
•    Watching a barefoot runner land on their heel does not mean that we were not born to run barefoot or that shoes need a cushioned heel.
•    Have fun!

Click here to visit the Natural Running Center!

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From the Expert: Dr. Mark Cucuzzella Talks Elastic Recoil

Posted by on Monday, January 28, 2013 @ 2:24 pm | Leave a reply

There is a lot of confusion around the term elastic recoil vs. braking in running.  A critical feature of efficient running is a strong and stable base of support.  Without this foundation, there can be no efficient transfer of energy.

Screen shot 2012 11 12 at 4.21.14 PM resized 600Our tendons are highly adapted to storing and releasing energy under tensile strain.  Jay Dicharry uses  a slingshot analogy.  As runners we must land a bit in front of our center of mass to store the energy and it then releases as we push off the ground.  This is not braking if done correctly.

Can we tell what the runner is actually doing with a video camera?  Not exactly, as we cannot see forces?

But we can make some likely conclusions with slow-motion film as one can see a springy motion vs. a hard hit and resulting shock wave with an overstride.  Muscles lengthen and shorten in the overstride and slow cadence pattern and compromise the elastic storage, as does trying to pick up your foot too soon with active muscle contraction (this is sprinting).

Rewatch this video on the “Principles of Natural Running” below. Do some of the drills shown in the video such as the jump rope and run with tether drill to learn how to land closer to your center. Also a must read is “Anatomy for Runners” by Jay Dicharry“.

 

 

Please be sure to visit Dr. Mark at The Natural Running Center!

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From the Expert: Danny Abshire Talks Foot Placement

Posted by on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 @ 2:37 pm | Leave a reply

Runners often exhibit form habits that can be attributed to  prior injuries, limited range of motion, and movement patterns. This generally results from years of sitting, standing and running with less than optimal alignment and running form.

Moving at a slow cadence and with sub-optimal movement patterns often results  in inefficiencies and, in some cases may lead to injury. Many runners strive to improve their running efficiency, to improve running speed or seek to have less wear and tear to the body. In the context of the above traits, some things can be improved on and other traits cannot. The goal would to be the most efficient runner YOU can be.

More parallel foot placement to the ground is going to be more efficient than a straight leg heel first landing. This is because the lower legs and feet are in a poor position to help attenuate impact and utilize the spring in the leg and foot muscles.

Slight heel landing with flexed knee is more efficient than landing with locked knee and extended heel strike. In a full foot / whole foot / midfoot landing the runner should feel the entire foot touch the ground at the same time. This means you will feel the heel touch with the rest of the foot. A midfoot strike should be more efficient than heel first because the foot and body can get in and out of maximum loading quicker. Maximum load occurs in mid-stance phase during a running gait and this is where the foot/ankle is stable and locked. The ankle and knee are flexed and the muscle/tendon complex is re-coiling like a spring.

A midfoot landing is relatively safe and efficient, but to maximize the benefits, you should have sufficient range of motion. This includes ankle dorsiflexion where the foot is raised upward. If you have past injuries of the ankle with limited dorsiflexion and over tightness in the calf muscles, a midfoot landing might be difficult to achieve..

Landing slightly on your forefoot and letting your heel relax to the ground is a very efficient foot strike and works well for faster and more efficient runners. Again, do you have the individual traits that allow you to land the way you choose or do you have some restrictions and limitations?

The mind and body connection, agility and coordinated whole body movement that comes from running form drills, an efficient cadence, core strength, core movement and relaxed foot placement can help runners become more efficient. Remember a good goal is to be the most efficient runner YOU can be to enjoy a lifetime of fun and fitness. 

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From the Expert: Ian Adamson Talks Stability

Posted by on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 @ 7:50 am | Leave a reply

Having good stability is a critical requirement for all runners. Each time your body moves over your foot (called mid-stance in the gait cycle) you are loading two to three times your body weight on your foot and a little less at each successive body part up the bio-mechnical chain – ankle, shin, knee, thigh, hip, etc.

Ian Adamson talks Stability in RunningIn mid-stance, all this force is on one leg, so you need to have good stability in order to do it safely and efficiently. If you are unable to balance on one leg with all this load, you can’t run. Put simply you will fall over. Runners with poor balance tend to rock side to side since they place their feet in a wide stance.

Stability is not just about balance, since muscular strength is required. Try this exercise to demonstrate:

1. Stand on one leg in front of a full length mirror

2. Keeping your foot flat to the ground, do a shallow squat by flexing your knee hip and ankle as far as possible

3. Make sure your body stays upright (don’t bend forward at the waist)

4. Slowly return to an upright position and keep repeating for as long as you can on two second cycles (one second down, one second up)

This is essential what you are doing (in the vertical axis) while running, but with about one body weight. Imagine doing this with two and a half. Most likely your leg will get tired and you will have to stop due to muscular fatigue.

Now do a few more repetitions and look a little more closely at your alignment (and consequently your stability.) Is your knee tracking straight and true? If not, this is almost certainly happening when you run. As a result, the misalignment at your knee will cause excess stress, which with repetition and load (that would be running) can cause pain and ultimately injury. Typical inures from knee misalignment include medial or lateral knee pain, ITB syndrome and medial shin splints (extrinsic muscles controlling the foot trying to compensate), plus a host more.

The solution is not obvious for most runners.

1. Choose a shoe that is not thick and soft so the surface under your foot is stable. Any shoe that relies on midsole foam for cushioning and is more than about 6 mm thick is probably not good. Soft foams are also unstable, the thicker and softer the worse it gets. Newton shoes do not rely on midsole foam and are essentially hard runner once you load them in a running gait.

2. Stabilize your leg to control the motion at the knee. The knee is a stable joint (like a hinge) and is controlled at either end. The primary muscle controlling the femur (thigh) in the stance phase of gait is the Gluteus Medius, the big muscle on your butt to the outside. This muscle stops your hip dropping and keeps your knee aligned side to side.

A good strength exercise for leg stability is the single leg shallow squat described above. This can be done while brushing your teeth (you do this anyway right?), with a goal of doing 30 repetitions each leg (two seconds per rep.) You have to do these exercises with precision, otherwise your are practicing poor form and will get good at doing these badly! For some people, this may only be two or three repetitions the first time until failure. Failure is when you loose control of your leg, for example knee doesn’t track straight, your hip drops, rises or you loos balance. Don’t worry, progress can be quite fast so after a few weeks you should be able to do this easily.

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