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Tag Archives: Races

  • Masters of Mileage

    We love sharing stories that illustrate how deeply “we live this stuff”.  Hopefully you caught Kara Henry and Stephen Gartside’s pre-Leadville 100 interview. Their results and post-race comments are a source of Newton pride.

    Pre-race Dinner The Night Before Leadville Pre-race Dinner The Night Before Leadville

    Newton: Describe your experience at the Leadville 100?

    Kara Henry: Looking back, I’ll tell you I had a blast the whole day…but during the race it was a different story.

    I definitely had a few moments of ‘WHAT AM I DOING??’ but luckily those were few and far between. I had an awesome crew who bullied me out of every aid station and never let me sit down. It’s because of that alone that I ran an hour faster than my goal.


    Stephen Gartside: For me, the Leadville 100 has been a new challenge after years of road marathons. You can’t beat the big open country that makes up the 100-mile route. It gives you some road and plenty of trail, with all kinds of elevation. I find that quite the challenge.

    The day unfolded with 50 miles of pretty easy running, then the 50-mile trip home with pacers, which goes all night. It’s kind of like a party with everyone out there running, pacing and volunteering.  My kind of party and it takes more mentally than just about anything else you can cram into a day.


    What was your highest high?

    KH: Absolutely hammering the last mile when I realized I could get under 24 hours. Actually, the reason I started pushing was because I saw what I thought was another female racer in front of me…I even made my pacers be super quiet so I could sneak up on ‘her’. When we got close I realized it was a dude with long blonde dreadlocks. I was bummed but at least it got me moving.

    Kara nearing the top of Hope Pass Kara nearing the top of Hope Pass

    SG: The highest high is when you know you are done with Hope Pass. Or, anytime a good song hits the iPod as you down some fresh caffeine. Of course, seeing that finish line is pretty sweet.

    Stephen running down Hope Pass Stephen running down Hope Pass

    What was your lowest low?

    KH: I hate climbing Hope Pass at mile 55 more than anything ever. HATE IT. I told my pacer to stop talking and ‘get me off this f**#$ing mountain.’ (Sorry Thom)

    SG: The lowest low for me in 2013 was losing everything in my stomach at mile 63.  Thank goodness I bounced back pretty fast, which is what you learn running ultras. You can come back from a low point!

    What would you tell someone who is thinking of running an ultra?

    KH: Don’t. Just kidding…I would tell them to find a training partner. I had so much fun training for Leadville this year because I had a great group to run with. Last year I trained on my own and too many hours on the trails alone is NOT good for your social skills.


    SG: If you are starting out with ultras my advice is slow down and you will be amazed at how far you can travel.  Find friends that share your interests and thus the journey. The Leadville 100 for me each year is more like a 6-month journey of getting ready, leading up to the actual race day.

    gartside finish3

    If we asked you the day after the race, would you have said you would run it again?

    KH: Yep! Because I’m a dummy and apparently a masochist.

    SG: After 3 straight years at the Leadville 100, I may need a few years off which means probably returning as a volunteer or pacer for at least 2014-15.

    post race

    What about now, two weeks later?

    KH: Now I’m thinking that I definitely won’t run it next year, but I’ll definitely do it again. I’d like to try a 100 closer to sea level.

    Kara Henry with her pacing team Kara Henry with her pacing team

    Editor’s Note: If Kara has lead you to believe that her recovery is all about pizza and beer, she has you fooled. Kara is currently running from hut to hut in the Alps in preparation for the U.S. 100 Mile Champs this winter. Shhh…don’t tell her that we told you!


  • Giving Back To Kids In Kauai

    In the last two years of visiting the island of Kauai and winning the Kauai Marathon I felt a connection to the island.  In 2011, I stayed in a family’s guest bedroom and felt like I was a member of the family. I could not afford to stay in a hotel so this was the most affordable place I could find off of This ended up being a “blessing in disguise” because I was able live like a local for a week.  Sadly, I noticed the poverty was prevalent across the island.  As a runner, I became immediately aware of the lack of proper shoes.  I learned that there was not a running specialty store on the island and many are therefore only able buy their shoes at K-Mart, Walmart, or Costco.  This year I wanted to make a positive difference to the island and I thought it would be very beneficial to get the kids on the island in Newton shoes.  If you’ve ever browsed the Newton Running Website, you’d find a global responsibility page that highlights a lot of the great work being done across the world through Newton Running. When I proposed the idea to Newton, they liked the idea to donate shoes to the Kauai youths and I went to work with the Kauai Marathon to organize it.  The Kauai Marathon loved the plan and a few months later we had nearly 100 pairs of sizes for elementary and high school students shipped to Kauai.

    Tyler 1

    This year was the first year the Kauai Marathon added Keiki (kid’s) races.  The toddler trot was for kids up for 4 years old (100m dash), the 4-7 age group will race 1/4 mile and the 8-12 age group will race the 1/2 mile.  The course was planned on a beautiful section of grass next to the Grand Hyatt. We also did a ‘fun run’ on a dirt cane road near the Grand Hyatt.  In addition, Bart Yasso (CRO at Runner’s World), Dean Karnazes (ultramarathon man), Michael Wardian, and myself would be at the expo for presentations and Q&A.  Since the high school runners rarely have the opportunity to learn about running, this was a great opportunity to get the high school kids excited for cross country season. The big goal of the two weeks: get kids inspired to run and live a healthy lifestyle while providing shoes to the kids that need them.

    Tyler 2

    The Kauai Marathon decided to make a $500 donation to the school that brought in the most participants to the Keiki races.  This was publicized and the marathon public relations director Robin Jumper went to work on organizing the elementary schools for me to give a presentation.  I gave presentation to full school assemblies at four elementary schools and ran with three high school cross country teams. The goal was to get the kids excited to run the Keiki races, inform them what running is all about, and to share my experiences traveling across the US and the world. I learned that kids are very brave and love to ask questions.  Some of the questions I received were…

    “What the longest you’ve ever run?”

    “How many medals do you have?”

    “How many race have you won?”

    “Have you ever raced Usain Bolt?”

    When asked if I have ever raced Usain Bolt, my response was “No, but I guarantee that if he shows up on Sunday I can beat him in the marathon!!”

    On Wednesday I had a meeting with the mayor where he was shocked at the generosity.  He said that I was his “braddah” and I was blessed for helping with the kids. He explained how the island is building bike and walking paths to give kids and parents the opportunity to walk or bike to school/work.  He was hopeful that the Kauai Marathon youth program and Newton Running would inspire more kids to lead a healthy lifestyle.  This meeting with the mayor lead to a newspaper article (“Students Score Newtons”) in the Garden Isle that spread the word about the Kauai Marathon Youth Program and Newton shoes donation.

    Tyler 3

    On Saturday morning, the course that race director Bob Craver and I designed, was fortunate to have an impressive 171 kids running around it with their parents and spectators cheering them on! To put that number into perspective, I talked to all schools within a half hour drive and that was about 750 kids less than 13 years old. Some of the kids came from the mainland, but that’s still over 10% of the keiki’s came from local elementary schools! I spent the morning cheering on the kids and taking pictures with them and their parents. It was a fantastic morning and a very successful event. I took so many pictures with families where I had spoke to the kids at the schools. My favorite was the registration form that came back saying they signed up because the daughter heard me speak in school. A picture says a 1,000 words so here are a few gems mostly from Jo Evans of Dakine Images of the event…

    All Keiki races were led by a giant rooster. Yes, he is undefeated (121-0 in fact) in his career leading keiki races.

    Tyler 4 Photo posted by Brennecke’s BeachFront Restaurant after the Keiki Races!
    Tyler 5 JT Service (, Dean Karnazes and I getting the kids warmed up. JT did a wonderful job getting the kids moving, warmed-up, and excited for the races!
    Tyler 7 One of the proudest moments of my life was reading this…inspiring kids to run and lead a healthy lifestyle is so important.

    When I walked back to my room and laid down after the event, all I could think about was how incredible this event was.  This was by far the most rewarding experience in my life.  Immediately I started thinking… “How can I get more kids to participate?  How do I help more kids have proper footwear?  How do I inspire more kids to run and lead a healthy lifestyle?  How in the world do I properly thank the Kauai Marathon and Newton Running for allowing me to be a part of this incredible experience?  How do I spread the word to other runners about what an amazing family event the Kauai Marathon weekend is? How do we get more high school kids in Kauai to do cross country and participate in the events?

    The next morning was the Kauai Marathon and my turn to run.

    The next morning was the Kauai Marathon and my turn to run.  I woke up at 2:45AM, had breakfast, and was browsing the newspaper to kill time.  I found a 'letter to the editor' from one of the high school coaches who applauded me for being a role model for young kids. At that point I knew that I couldn't lose the race.  After speaking to the kids about setting goals, working hard towards your goal, and then the joy of sharing your success with others, I knew I had to be a living example for them. Two hours, twenty-one minutes, thirty-three seconds, and 26.2 miles later I achieved my goal of winning the race and setting a new course record.  I was motivated by the dozens of handmade signs on the course that said "Go Tyler" and the number of volunteers that cheered me on by name.

    Pomaika'i is the hawaiian word for good fortune/good luck.  When I was doing my last long run on the island before the race a white owl flew in front of me for nearly a mile.  The owl is a symbol of pomaika'i and the white owl is the rarest of all.  Without the fear of sounding cheesy, Newton Running is going to experience a lot of pomaika'i for the generosity this year.  Thank you all for letting me be a part of it!

    Enjoy the photos below…

    Tyler 9 With the Island School XC Team
    Tyler 10 On my way to a new course record at the 2013 Kauai Marathon!


  • Kōkua: Helping Others One Triathlon at a Time

    By Nicole Clark

    Back in February, I heard from my husband, Nick Clark, about the potential for a Newton Running Ambassador Team. Then, I noticed the application on Facebook to apply for the inaugural IRONMAN Foundation Newton Running Ambassador Triathlon team. It took me about a week to finish up the application process and another month until I received an official email stating that I was chosen to be part of the team.

    Being part of this team is quite an honor. We have more than 40 teammates from around North America with one common goal: to give back to the communities in which we are racing. Our team motto is kōkua, which means “extending loving, sacrificial help to others for their benefit, not for personal gain...” This sums up exactly what our team is all about. I wanted to be part of a team that wasn't focused on PR’s, splits and power, although that is perfectly fine, I felt like this team was going to be more than just that.  I love training, racing and being at different venues, but raising money for the different charities and community outreach programs for select IRONMAN races has been an amazing experience to be part of.


    I am fortunate enough to live in a great community. I have amazing friends and family all over the country who have supported this experience. I reached out to a local restaurant in Louisville, Colorado, Lucky Pie, where they support fundraising events. They were kind enough to allow me to host a silent auction social. We had wonderful local business who donated for the event, ranging from teeth whitening, local triathlon shop packages, to autographed Craig Alexander Newton Running visors. We also had representation from Newton Running, Ironman and IMF teammates.

    The monies raised by my teammates and I will go to local Henderson charities served by the IRONMAN Foundation at the IRONMAN World Championship 70.3: Coronado High School Band, Coronado High School, Clark County School District, Foothills High School, Student Council Getting 2 Tri Foundation, Grant a Gift Autism Foundation, Green Valley C.H.A.N.C.E., Green Valley Women’s Basketball, Green Valley Wrestling, Greenspun Junior High, Henderson Lacrosse Club, James Gibson Elementary, Nevada Children's Cancer Foundation, Pinecrest Academy, SECTA Student Organization of Latinos and Somerset Academy of Las Vegas.

    I qualified back in September 2012 at Branson 70.3 for the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championships 2013.  What a great set up for the year ahead. This made fun planning for upcoming races. Leading up to Vegas, I raced the Boulder Tri Series and Kansas 70.3. I had the opportunity to race Vegas two years ago, while living in Florida. Now that I live in Colorado, with the ability to train at altitude and really knowing how to ride hills while also having the advantage of knowing what the course is like, I feel like I am a little more seasoned and prepared for a great race. I’m really looking forward to having fun, enjoying the weekend with family and friends coming to support me and meeting new teammates at our charity project.

    Ironman 70.3 World Championships donation page
    Nicole Clark’s Blog
    IRONMAN Foundation Newton Running Ambassador Triathlon Team
  • Training with KPeasey

    By Kyle Pease

    Brent and Kyle Pease are a team of brothers from Atlanta Georgia who compete together in athletic competitions — despite the fact that Kyle is relegated to a wheelchair, the result of Cerebral Palsy at birth. Brent, his older brother, pushes, pedals and paddles Kyle in 5k's, 10k's, marathons and triathlons to encourage those who witness their efforts that anything is possible. Through their foundation, The Kyle Pease Foundation, the duo raise funds to promote success for persons with disabilities by providing assistance to meet their individual needs through sports.  


    The following is from Kyle Pease’s blog: Where There is a Wheel There’s a Way:

    I’ve been finding it difficult to fall asleep at night knowing that everything that Brent and I have been working toward is just around the corner. Up until this point, the greatest moment of our running career occurred recently at the Peachtree 10K, where we became the first assisted pair in the long history of the race to compete. It doesn’t get any better than the local crowds cheering our names as we traveled 6.2 miles through the familiar streets of our hometown Atlanta…or does it?

    Now, just two months later, Brent and I will make Pease history as we try to have the word “Ironman” etched next to our names. For this, we will cover 140.6 miles through the water and roadways of rural Madison, Wisconsin — 2.4 miles of swimming, 112 miles on the bike, and finishing with the 26.2 mile marathon. Our goal is to break the 17-hour mark, which of course would make us forever IRONMEN. But even though Brent and I are hoping for a time between 14 and 16 hours, I’ll be honest anything this side of 16:59:59 is good enough. But that one second, is the second that differentiates an Ironman from a couple of guys who competed to truly becoming Ironmen.


    Now, as strange as some people find it, I have been training harder than I ever have in my life. Many people think that I have the easy part. Although Brent may agree with them while he’s paddling, pedaling and pushing me for 140.6 miles, it is important for me to be prepared for this, too. I have never sat on a bike for nearly nine hours and the average human body is not likely to fare well without proper preparation. Brent and I are training far longer and more often than we normally do in order to get both of our bodies used to the many miles and hours out on the course. I’ve been eating better than I normally do and have been trying to increase my liquid intake. I’m struggling a bit there, as I don’t really enjoy drinking water, but it’s very important to stay hydrated. It would be a shame if Brent was up to the task, but I wasn’t. It’s important to me to not let my brother and my teammate down.

    My trainer, Matthew Rose, (yes I have a trainer) tells me to visualize the shoot. The thought of 45,000 screaming fans lining the shoot at the end of the race is something I just can’t imagine, despite his efforts to help me mentally imagine what it will be like. That is the golden carrot hanging just in front of me that will motivate and inspire me and subsequently inspire Brent to the finish line.

    Yet, there’s one very important thing for my readers and our fans to remember, becoming an Ironman is not and never will be for or about Brent and me. It’s about our Foundation and the people who we are hoping to inspire: People who see what we are about to accomplish and believe that anything is possible through our efforts.

    We are very proud of the Kyle Pease Foundation and take great pleasure in seeing the looks on the faces of the athletes who compete with us. It is exciting to know that through the efforts of a few, we have impacted the lives of many. Although Brent and I will be thrilled to wear the Ironman medal around our necks on the evening of September 8th, we really know that the medal symbolically hangs from the necks of all those friends, fans, athletes and sponsors of the Kyle Pease Foundation. We know that through their continued inspiration and efforts that the only thing that will not be humanly possible is finishing in a second more than 16:59:59. Off to Wisconsin!


  • Race Roundup: Downhill Mile, Dawg Days XTERRA, Ironman Austria

    The Downhill Mile

    A few weeks after racing in Western Africa, Roberto Mandje placed second at The Downhill Mile road race in Superior, Colorado, on July 4th.

    "I figured it'd be fun to race such a short
    distance," says Mandje, who clocked 4:10 on the fast course. "I would've liked to run quicker,
    but with zero speed work and barely a week after returning from Africa, I'll take it. I always enjoy racing  and supporting local races."


    Colbert Tops Women's Field at the Dawg Days XTERRA

    After breaking her foot during the run leg of the Dawg Days XTERRA offroad triathlon a few years ago, Lucia Colbert, 54, was thrilled to find herself leading the women's field at this year's race, held on June 25th in Little Rock, Arkansas.

    She rocked the 0.5-mile swim, 12-mile mountain bike and 4-mile trail run with a total time of 2:06:00 and the overall women's victory.

    "I didn’t have my best day because of a sore hamstring, but ended up winning by staying steady," says Colbert. "I wore my Lady Issac Guidance Trainers to protect my toes from all the rocks. In fact, the men's overall winner also broke his toe on the run!"

    Find full results here:

    Awesome at Ironman Austria


    "There’s nothing quite like the “Big Show” of Ironman Austria," says Newton Running athlete Meredith Dolhare. "They’ve been doing this event for a long time, and have it down right. The swim was beautiful, the bike was one of my favorite courses ever, and the run can be super fast. Spectator and volunteer support are second to none for a European race."

    Dolhare had a great race in Klagenfurt, Austria, on July 1, especially considering that she had completed Ironman France just one week earlier. Her time of 11:35:22 placed her 26th in her age group.

    "I went faster in all three disciplines, and my legs held up pretty well," says says. "I was very surprised to have ridden so well, however, I wish I could have carried that into the run. Incredibly enough, the top-five women in my age group went under 10 hours. Last year, my time would have been ninth, so I am kind of shocked at the placement."

  • Race Roundup: Britton Memorial Tri, Rev3 Quassy 70.3

    Smith Fourth at Buster Britton Memorial Sprint Tri

    Newton Running athlete Neal Smith placed fourth in his age group at the Buster Briton Memorial Triathlon in Pelham, Alabama on June 11.

    The 25-year-old sprint-distance triathlon took place at the beautiful Oak Mountain State Park and is one of the longest running triathlons in Alabama. The race honors the life of Buster Britton--one of the Birmingham area's original triathletes that lost his life in a fun run after completing the Hawaii Ironman only a short time earlier.

    "Despite an extremely hilly course and high temperatures, I bettered my time from last year by over 8 minutes," says Smith, who finished 29th overall with a time of 1:05:53. "I improved most significantly on the run thanks to my Newton Light Weight Distance Trainers!"

    Revved Up at Rev3 70.3

    The Rev3 Quassy 70.3 Triathlon boasts an amazing venue with an extremely hilly bike course and very challenging (though beautiful) run in Middlebury, CT.

    At the June 4th event, Andrew Salmon placed 15th in his age group (63rd overall) against a very competitive field.

    "My day went well despite not having the greatest swim," says Salmon. "I rode the bike smart hoping to put a solid run up on the board. Thankfully proper pacing on the bike allowed me a to post a top-nine run for my age group of 1 hour 23 minutes."

    Josh Gelman, television producer for 48 Hours, also competed at Rev3 Quassy, is pictured here wearing the Gravity Neutral Performance Trainers.

    Another Hot Day at Eagleman 70.3

    Newton Running athlete Chad Holderbaum raced at the Eagleman 70.3 Triathlon in Cambridge, Maryland last weekend, his sixth time at the half-Ironman event.

    As always, the heat is a challenge and it is a great course gearing up for Kona," says Holderbaum. "The day went really well for me and I had a personal best by 11 minutes on the course. I really pushed the bike and averaged over 25mph and even though I faded some on the run, I still managed to run a 1:29 half marathon in the grueling heat!

    Holderbaum finished 9th amateur overall and 5th in the 30-34 age group with a time of 4:17.

  • Race Roundup: XTERRA Moab, Teva Mountain Games and More!

    MORF in Moab

    Team MORF was back at the races last weekend, with Debby Sullivan placing 9th women (first in her age group) at the XTERRA Moab triathlon in Utah.

    "The race went well for the most part," says Sullivan. "It has been really hard to mountain bike much or spend time time running on trails since they are all still covered in snow up here in the Colorado mountains.

    The swim started out in Ken's Lake and it was cold!  I got in the water extra early to adjust, which helped me tremendously. The swim went smoothly and I felt good during most of the mountain bike. The course was very technical but I was had fun and pushed hard on the out-and-back Steelbender Trail.

    At the bike turnaround I was in fourth place, but the return trip I did not go as smoothly. I held strong despite not being at my full strength due to an injury to a month-old ankle injury, but continued to do well during the run until I rolled my ankle and hobbled the last 2.5 miles to the finish."

    Read more about Debby's race on her blog, and an article about the race on Sky Hi Daily News.

    Jeremy Freed Second at Teva Mountain Games 10K

    Less than a week after winning the citizen's division at the Bolder Boulder 10K, Newton Running's Jeremy Freed placed second against a stacked field at the Teva Mountain Games Spring Runoff 10K trail race in Vail, Colorado. Freed, wearing the MV2 Speed Racer on muddy and partially snow-covered trails, battled against national trail-running champion Max King before King pulled ahead for the win in 41:30. Freed finished just 10 seconds back.

    Check out this article for a race recap and photos on

    Roberto Mandje Third in Half Marathon Despite Run-In with Taxi

    Newton Running's Roberto Manje completed the toughest race of his career last weekend in West Africa, finishing third in the long half-marathon course with a time of 1:12:50, despite being hit by a car mid-race.

    "The race started at 10:30 a.m. instead of the scheduled 8:00, by which time the 90+ degree heat combined with 95% humidity was brutal," says Manje. "On top of all that, the race was 23.5K (instead of the usual 21.1K half-marathon distance.) But the toughest challenge was getting nicked in the hand and side by a taxi. YES! The race organizers didn't even close the roads so cars zoomed by the whole way. When the taxi hit me, I fell down momentarily passed out before getting up and finishing the race. I'm happy to be alive and survive all the carnage to finish third!"

  • Freed is Fast at Bolder Boulder 10K Citizen's Race

    On Memorial Day weekend, 54,000 runners toed the line of the start line of the 33rd annual Bolder Boulder 10K, including Newton Running employee Jeremy Freed. Freed pulled away in the first mile to win the highly competitive race by a 40-second margin. The victory was sweet for the runner, who competed in track (1,500 meters) for the University of Colorado, but spent much of his college career hampered by injuries.

    "My pre-race goal was to ideally finish in the top few individuals and I figured that it would take somewhere around 30:30 to do so," says Freed. "I hadn't raced the Bolder Boulder since I was a sophomore in high school, so I was excited to be able to be part of such a great running event again.

    I started out in the top 10 and ran a very comfortable 4:48 for the first mile. At about a 1.25 to 1.5 miles, the pace started to lag and I decided to take the lead. I never relinquished the lead and it was exciting to finish up in Folsom Field in front of a great crowd! My 30:28 finishing time was a PR [personal record], which is always satisfying."

    Read more about Freed's race in this Boulder Daily Camera article.

    The elite race brought many elite runners to Newton Running's home town of Boulder, Colorado, including American distance star Ryan Hall (center) and 2007 NCAA National Cross Country Running Champion, Josh McDougal, pictured here with Newton Running's Kara Henry. Hall finished 7th (top American) in the men's elite race.  For full results, visit:

  • Race Roundup: Early Season Triathlons Test Athletes

    Fast out of the Blocks

    It's only May and yet triathlete Andrew Block has raced more than many of us race in a year! He sent us recap of his season so far:

    "I started the year racing well and looking great in my special-edition Newton Running PCF Distance Racers and new Team BC/Newton/MultiSports Gear! My first race was the Carlsbad Half Marathon, where I again placed seventh in my age group (40-44).

    Three weeks later I competed at the San Diego Half marathon where I set a half-marathon PR on the hilly course and placed fifth.

    On February 27, I ran in pro triathlete Kate Major's Run to Help the Aussie Flood Victims, where Beaker Concepts donated product and of course ran a very fast Beach 5K, followed by the Palm Springs Triathlon, where I placed fifth yet again.

    Last Spring Race was the Rhoto Oceanside 70.3. As it was always a "B" race, my main goal was to have a fast run. Alas, I developed leg cramps during the swim, and when it came time to run, my fast legs were not there. Regardless, I managed a commendable run and was happy to have a FRESH pair of Newton Running Light Weight Trainers, I believe is the best shoe for me!

    Now I'm preparing for the Fontana Half Marathon on June 4, while we await word on getting into the St. George Marathon where, in 2010, I qualified for the Boston Marathon again with a more than 20-minute cushion.

    Lemos Has a Great Day at Columbia Triathlon

    On Sunday, Christopher Lemos competed in Maryland's Columbia Triathlon, which is one of the most challenging and longest running (EST 1984) Olympic distance races in the USA; attracting world-class professional and amateur athletes from around the globe.

    Lemos shaved over five minutes off his race time over last year's Columbia Triathlon. He exited the water in fourth place and moved up to third during the bike portion, and then into second during the run. Unfortunately, that's when things unraveled a bit and in the last couple of miles, Lemos's pace slowed, yet he still finished a very respectable fourth out of 132 (in the 30-34 age group) with time of 2:09:27.

    His next race is the Subaru Eagleman 70.3 Ironman on June 12th.

    Team MORF is Without Limits

    Vanessa Carmean competed at last weekend's Without Limits Summer Open Sprint Triathlon, and in her report on the MORF Racing Team blog, managed to have a lot of fun despite going off course.

    "I had a bit of a mix up on the bike course but it was a beautiful morning and I was excited to be racing again!" reports Vanessa. "I had taken some time off from running while I tried to rest and repair what I thought was a running-related injury (but was really just a result of doing too much too soon), but was what really helped was doing some exercises. My last two races were really the most running I've done in a few months, but I have a green light to resume training now, so I'm looking forward to that.

    Read her race report here:

  • Newton Athlete Jeremy Freed Motivates Kids to Run

    Newton Athlete Jeremy Freed recently began a series of presentations about the value of exercise and good nutrition to hundreds of kids  at Parmalee Elementary in Indian Hills, Colorado, Marshdale Elementary in Evergreen, Colorado, and West Jefferson Middle School in Evergreen, Colorado.

    "A parent involved with organizing the a kid's race called the Evergreen Rodeo Stampede Fun Run asked me to  speak to the local students about the importance of running and exercise, sharing my experiences in sports and the importance of proper nutrition for long-term health," says Freed.

    Freed also got the kids fired up about an upcoming race called the Kid's Rodeo Stampede Fun Run, sponsored by Newton Running, on May 28, as a chance to get a taste of the thrill and sense of accomplishment that comes with finishing a race.  The competition includes a 1-mile, 2-mile and a 50-yard dash. "Spreading the message of youth health literacy is extremely important and, as an athlete, I feel that I can be a good example and provide a meaningful message," says Freed.

    "The kids really responded well to the 45-minute presentation," says Freed. "I spoke for a bit and then got them off the floor and running in place, doing plyometrics and stretching. The kids then got to ask questions about the presentation before they returned to class.

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