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From the Expert: Danny Abshire Talks Foot Placement

Posted by on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 @ 2:37 pm | Leave a reply

Runners often exhibit form habits that can be attributed to  prior injuries, limited range of motion, and movement patterns. This generally results from years of sitting, standing and running with less than optimal alignment and running form.

Moving at a slow cadence and with sub-optimal movement patterns often results  in inefficiencies and, in some cases may lead to injury. Many runners strive to improve their running efficiency, to improve running speed or seek to have less wear and tear to the body. In the context of the above traits, some things can be improved on and other traits cannot. The goal would to be the most efficient runner YOU can be.

More parallel foot placement to the ground is going to be more efficient than a straight leg heel first landing. This is because the lower legs and feet are in a poor position to help attenuate impact and utilize the spring in the leg and foot muscles.

Slight heel landing with flexed knee is more efficient than landing with locked knee and extended heel strike. In a full foot / whole foot / midfoot landing the runner should feel the entire foot touch the ground at the same time. This means you will feel the heel touch with the rest of the foot. A midfoot strike should be more efficient than heel first because the foot and body can get in and out of maximum loading quicker. Maximum load occurs in mid-stance phase during a running gait and this is where the foot/ankle is stable and locked. The ankle and knee are flexed and the muscle/tendon complex is re-coiling like a spring.

A midfoot landing is relatively safe and efficient, but to maximize the benefits, you should have sufficient range of motion. This includes ankle dorsiflexion where the foot is raised upward. If you have past injuries of the ankle with limited dorsiflexion and over tightness in the calf muscles, a midfoot landing might be difficult to achieve..

Landing slightly on your forefoot and letting your heel relax to the ground is a very efficient foot strike and works well for faster and more efficient runners. Again, do you have the individual traits that allow you to land the way you choose or do you have some restrictions and limitations?

The mind and body connection, agility and coordinated whole body movement that comes from running form drills, an efficient cadence, core strength, core movement and relaxed foot placement can help runners become more efficient. Remember a good goal is to be the most efficient runner YOU can be to enjoy a lifetime of fun and fitness. 

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Andrea’s Need For Speed

Posted by on Thursday, September 27, 2012 @ 8:56 am | Leave a reply

I will fully and happily admit that I’ve never been a technical runner. I’ve never owned a Garmin, never run intervals or tempos, never had a training plan, and never really cared about pace and time. I’ll also admit that in some ways, I’m a bit of a lazy runner. I’ve never really been one to push myself, other than when it comes to increasing my distance. To me, it always seemed a reasonable assumption that if I kept upping my distance, and putting in the miles with consistency, I would eventually become a better and faster runner. To a certain extent, this assumption is not completely off base. As a running neophyte, you need to focus on creating a foundation of endurance to build upon. However, when you find your self lingering in a comfort zone for too long, at a certain point you have to either start pushing yourself, or face that fact that your performance is simply not going to improve.

2012-09-24 18.13.281Injuries aside, I’ve been running in the comfort zone for an embarrassingly long time. I’ve developed a pace that is comfortable for me, feels great, and allows me to complete my long distance runs without exerting undue amounts of energy. But over the summer, I became increasingly aware that I’d come as far as I could without finding a way to push myself. With two half marathons on the horizon, I also realized I needed the structure of a training plan. Not being exceptionally good at planning, organizing and implementing any kind of a scheduled routine, or motivating myself to try anything outside of my routine, I decided my best course of action would be to enroll in a training clinic. I spent a good amount of time researching and considering my options. Some clinics I found were simply too technical for my level of interest, throwing around jargon like “threshold” and “zone”. Some were simply an increasingly long run once a week, and I balked at the idea of paying money to do what I was already doing on my own. When I stumbled upon the Forerunner’s summer clinic, I knew I’d found exactly what I was looking for, and I knew it was going to hurt. In a good way.

The Forerunner’s clinic offered a full training plan; every week included a group speed session, a group long run, and one or two guided “homework” runs to be completed on your own time. I decided to forgo the weekly distance group runs, as I prefer to complete my long runs solo, and don’t feel like I require either guidance or additional motivation to do so. The weekly speed session was what I most needed to incorporate into my training, and something I didn’t feel I could accomplish on my own. I can say, without reservation, that the Forerunner’s clinic is the best thing that has happened to my running since I discovered Newtons!

The first session was horrific, commencing with a 2 kilometer run uphill. We did some running drills, then proceeded on to 800 meter repeats at 25% more than 10k pace. I ran in the 60-65 minute 10k pace group, which also happened to be the slowest group, and I was certainly nowhere near the front of the pack. I struggled to keep up with my group members, and by the end of the last 800 meters, I was more exhausted than I had been after my last half marathon. I was defeated and discouraged, and pretty sure I wasn’t going to repeat that exercise in humiliation the next week. I dragged myself home, and after a soak in an ice bath, found myself recounting the excruciating details of this torture session to my roommate. “Wow,” she said, “it sounds like you really pushed yourself hard!” And with those words came clarity. Yes, I HAD pushed myself hard to complete the session (although admittedly out of a perverse refusal to be the slowest in the group). It had been unpleasant, difficult, and strenuous, and that’s everything a speed workout is supposed to be! It’s not supposed to be comfortable like a distance pace, and it’s certainly not supposed to feel easy. The point of a speed workout is to go hard for a short amount of time, and push yourself to the outer limits of your endurance. You should feel utter exhaustion when you finish, because you should give everything you have. If it feels easy or comfortable, then you’re doing it wrong.

So i went back the next week,and the week after, and after a few sessions I was hooked. Every session was different. Hill repeats, 200 meter progressions, pyramids, mile time trials. Each workout presented me with a unique set of challenges, forcing me to adapt and push myself in different ways. Each workout left me feeling wrung out and decimated and, paradoxically, energized and elated. There’s really no feeling on earth like pushing yourself up to and beyond your limits, then enjoying the well-earned exhaustion that follows such an effort. Most satisfying of all were the improvements I began to see in my running. My endurance increased rapidly and my recovery time decreased. Having become more aware of how my body feels at different speeds, I learned how to pace my runs in order to finish in a certain time or run a negative split. And yes, my speed began to increase, slowly but steadily.

Fortunately for me, Forerunner’s also offers a fall clinic which conveniently leads up to my second half marathon, the Fall Classic. By the end of the summer clinic, I had moved up a pace group.Three weeks into the fall clinic, I feel ready to move up another pace group, and the speed workouts are starting to come more naturally to me. Due to the injuries I’m still working to recover from, I haven’t been able to train for this half as long or as hard as I would have liked. My longest distance run this season was just shy of 18 km, and I had to begin tapering this week. I’m certainly not expecting to produce a PR this time around. However, due to how hard I’ve been able to push myself in my speed workouts, I feel more prepared for this race than for any event I’ve run to date. I have confidence in my endurance, my ability to pace myself for a faster second half, and my capacity to dig deep when my energy begins to flag in order to push past my limits and finish strong.

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Welcome to the School of Running

Posted by on Wednesday, August 29, 2012 @ 2:10 pm | Leave a reply

Today Newton is very excited to be launching our School of Running (SOR) here in Boulder, Colorado. The mission of the SOR is to spread the knowledge of good, natural running form around the world by educating those who are interested in teaching others to become better runners and who wish to become better and more efficient runners themselves.

The first session of SOR which began today is educating a handful of North American retail ambassadors. Soon the School of Running will expand to include Newton’s recently revamped Coach Certification Program. Details of that program will be coming soon but for now the dates of the first sessions are below.

 

 

Friday, September 21, 2012 – Saturday, September 22, 2012

Newton Natural Running™ Coach Certification

What: Newton Natural Running™ Coach Certification
Who: Newton Running – School of Running
Where: 1300 Walnut Street, Suite 120
Boulder CO 80302 US
Date: Friday, September 21, 2012 – Saturday, September 22, 2012
REGISTER NOW »
Saturday, October 27, 2012 – Sunday, October 28, 2012

Newton Natural Running™ Coach Certification

What: Newton Natural Running™ Coach Certification
Who: Newton Running – School of Running
Where: 1300 Walnut Street, Suite 120
Boulder CO 80302 US
Date: Saturday, October 27, 2012 – Sunday, October 28, 2012
REGISTER NOW »
Friday, November 9, 2012 – Saturday, November 10, 2012

Newton Natural Running™ Coach Certification

What: Newton Natural Running™ Coach Certification
Who: Newton Running – School of Running
Where: 1300 Walnut Street, Suite 120
Boulder CO 80302 US
Date: Friday, November 9, 2012 – Saturday, November 10, 2012
REGISTER NOW »
Saturday, December 8, 2012 – Sunday, December 9, 2012

Newton Natural Running™ Coach Certification

What: Newton Natural Running™ Coach Certification
Who: Newton Running – School of Running
Where: 1300 Walnut Street, Suite 120
Boulder CO 80302 US
Date: Saturday, December 8, 2012 – Sunday, December 9, 2012
REGISTER NOW »

 

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